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Health and Safety In Nuclear Org.

  1. Jul 25, 2010 #1
    Hi,
    I am a new member here...
    I am a Doctoral candidate. I am looking for suggestions on research topics for a Ph.D. thesis in "Health and Safety in Nuclear Organisation". I would appreciate any ideas that you might have on topics that you might feel are worth considering as a result of your experience. What follows is some background so that you may understand my situation.

    I've a medical background -I have completed my MSc in Blood Transfusion Science and BSc(Hon) in Biomedical Science and I am currently pursuing doctoral studies. I am in the process of coming up with a thesis topic to propose to my graduate department. I am thinking about Health & Safety in nuclear/radioactive organisation-but need some advice and suggestions.

    I would be grateful if you can help me.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 26, 2010
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 25, 2010 #2

    Choppy

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    Do you mean health and safety in a nuclear energy workplace? Or do you mean the organization of health and safety standards within a workplace? Or are you talking about the health consequences of long term storage of radioisotopes?

    Also - it's probably not a good idea to base a PhD thesis on the suggestions of random people online. If you don't already have a good idea of what the hot areas are in your subject area - why did you choose to pursue a PhD in this field?
     
  4. Jul 25, 2010 #3
    Hi Choppy
    yes, I mean health and safety in nuclear energy workplace
     
  5. Jul 25, 2010 #4

    jtbell

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    Do you not have a Ph.D. advisor who is familiar with the field and can help you choose a specific dissertation topic? This is the usual practice in the US; is this not the case where you are?
     
  6. Jul 25, 2010 #5
    actually no i dont have any advisor
     
  7. Jul 26, 2010 #6

    Choppy

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    You could look into something called radiation hormesis. Typically radiation safety standards apply a linear no threshold model for purposes of safety - the assumption being that any amount of radiation can be harmful. However, there is some evidence to suggest that exposure to low levels of radiation can actually improve overall health and reduce cancer rates. This is a somewhat controversial area.

    Another option might be coducting some case studies into radiation accidents. Why is it that exposure incidents still happen despite strict regulations in the industry?

    Another option mught be perception versus truth. Many people in the workplace now were a part of the "duck and cover" generation - growing up they were taught drills for nuclear attacks in school and this naturally has led to a public fear of all things radioactive. In perspective, is this fear warranted compared to other workplace risks?
     
  8. Jul 27, 2010 #7
    Dear Choppy
    Thanks for your concern and for answering my question
    I think "radiation accidents" is good topic ...I am also reading some studies and reviews around this issue...I have been feeling lost .... Thanks Choppy for your valuable suggestions
     
  9. Jul 27, 2010 #8

    ZapperZ

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    Then there's something wrong with your school.

    This is very puzzling. If you are in a US institution, unless your Advisor left or died, you MUST have a Ph.D advisor for your research dissertation. He/she is the only person who can approve any dissertation work for your Ph.D consideration. You can't simply choose any topic you like. If your department has no one would is willing to serve as your mentor in a particular subject, then all the suggestion that we give you on here is a total waste of time.

    Zz.
     
  10. Jul 27, 2010 #9
    I have supervisor but not advisor...cant explain more!
     
  11. Jul 27, 2010 #10

    ZapperZ

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    Then neither can I with respect to your question.

    Zz.
     
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