Help determining best option for petrophysics

  • Thread starter ChaseRLewis
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In summary, the individual is currently working as an LWD field engineer for an oil company but wants to pursue a career in petrophysics. They have a degree in Chemical Engineering but are considering obtaining a geophysics degree. They are unsure if this can be done through correspondence or if they will have to move back to the city. They are also unsure if they can go back to school while maintaining a job in the oil and gas field. They are looking into the possibility of using their previous credits towards a second degree. They have been advised that their LWD experience is more valuable to oil companies than a geophysics degree, but they should continue to check for job openings.
  • #1
ChaseRLewis
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I've been working for an oil-company for the last 2 years as an LWD field engineer. My goal is to move back into the city and would like to pursue a petrophysics career.

I have a degree in Chemical Engineering, but I am told geophysics is the best way to pursue this. Is there any way to obtain a geophysics degree through correspondence or would I have to move back to the city? Looking at the university I graduated from it would take 3 to 4 semesters to graduate since I have about 60% of the credits already finished. However, I'm unsure if it is at all possible to go back to school while maintaining a reasonable job. I'd be fine with an intern level position but at least something where I can continue to build experience in the oil and gas field (trying to talk to my company about that currently).

I know in Chemical engineering a lot of people that came back to do their degrees would do a co-op or maintain a part-time work for a local engineering company but petrophysics is largely a career focused with the major oil companies so I'm unsure even where I could get part-time work like that without waiting a year or so after beginning to pursue geophysics.

Any help would be appreciated.
 
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  • #2
ChaseRLewis said:
Looking at the university I graduated from it would take 3 to 4 semesters to graduate since I have about 60% of the credits already finished.

Careful on this point, you don't typically get to reuse credits you have already received a degree for if you start a second one. You might get a waiver for those courses, but a waiver isn't a credit—it just means you get to skip the prerequesite. Unless your school is very different from any I've ever seen, you will almost certainly still need the complete the same number of courses as everyone else.
 
  • #3
LastOneStanding said:
Careful on this point, you don't typically get to reuse credits you have already received a degree for if you start a second one. You might get a waiver for those courses, but a waiver isn't a credit—it just means you get to skip the prerequesite. Unless your school is very different from any I've ever seen, you will almost certainly still need the complete the same number of courses as everyone else.

Hm, I figured it would be similar to transferring schools. I'll definitely look into. I mean I know people that double majored and were able to use the same class twice. I imagined I could basically do the same thing if I used my original classes. I mean I'm still in the university system and can register for classes without any additional applications or anything like that, so register as a double major then just take the specific courses I haven't taken yet. Regardless, I'll look into it.
 
  • #4
ChaseRLewis said:
Hm, I figured it would be similar to transferring schools. I'll definitely look into. I mean I know people that double majored and were able to use the same class twice. I imagined I could basically do the same thing if I used my original classes. I mean I'm still in the university system and can register for classes without any additional applications or anything like that, so register as a double major then just take the specific courses I haven't taken yet. Regardless, I'll look into it.

Whether or not you've already graduated makes a big difference. Double majoring is one thing—and even then there are typically rules about how much you can "double dip"—but once you graduate it's like you've cashed out, in a sense. In the event they do let you reuse some credits, I think it's very doubtful they'd give you credit for over half the degree.
 
  • #5
Hm, got an e-mail from a guy within my company that I contacted. He said that my resume would be enough to be hired and said that they are more interested in having 2+ years LWD experience then any actual geology experience though they do sometimes hire geophysics majors out of college but an engineering degree with LWD experience is plenty sufficient. Only looking for senior petrophysicists (5+ years experience and whatnot) at the moment but I should keep checking in.
 

Related to Help determining best option for petrophysics

1. What is petrophysics and why is it important?

Petrophysics is the science of studying and analyzing rock properties and their interactions with fluids, specifically in the context of oil and gas reservoirs. It is important because it helps determine the characteristics of the reservoir, such as porosity and permeability, which are crucial in making informed decisions about the production and development of hydrocarbon resources.

2. What factors should be considered when determining the best petrophysical option for a specific project?

When determining the best petrophysical option for a project, factors such as the type of rock, fluid content, and formation pressure must be considered. Other factors include the available data and resources, the objectives of the project, and the desired level of accuracy and precision.

3. How does petrophysics differ from other disciplines in the oil and gas industry?

Petrophysics is a multidisciplinary field that combines elements of geology, physics, and engineering to study rock properties and their impact on hydrocarbon reservoirs. It differs from other disciplines in the oil and gas industry by focusing specifically on the physical and chemical properties of rocks and their interactions with fluids.

4. What methods and tools are commonly used in petrophysics?

Some common methods and tools used in petrophysics include well logging, core analysis, and seismic imaging. Well logging uses tools to measure various properties of the rock and fluid within a wellbore, while core analysis involves analyzing physical samples of the rock. Seismic imaging uses sound waves to create images of subsurface structures and can provide valuable information about the rock properties.

5. How does petrophysics contribute to the overall success of an oil and gas project?

Petrophysics plays a crucial role in the success of an oil and gas project by providing valuable data and insights about the reservoir. This information is used to make informed decisions about the production and development of the resource, which can ultimately impact the profitability and efficiency of the project. Without petrophysics, it would be much more difficult to accurately assess the potential of a reservoir and make effective decisions for its development.

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