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Heterogeneous equilibria: concentration of solids issue

  • #1
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Homework Statement


Hello!

Here is the quote from the chemistry textbook by Tro:

However, since carbon is a solid, its concentration is constant—it does not change.

Adding more or less carbon to the reaction mixture does not change the concentration

of carbon. The concentration of a solid does not change because a solid does

not expand to fill its container. The concentration of a solid, therefore, depends

only on its density, which (except for slight variations due to temperature) is constant

as long as some solid is present. Consequently, pure solids—those reactants or

products labeled in the chemical equation with an (s )—are not included in the

equilibrium expression.

Homework Equations


3. The Attempt at a Solution [/B]
I will be grateful for your help because I do not understand everything that is said in the above quote.
Please, correct my assumptions or explain what I miss:
- I understand that the concentration of the solid will not change no matter how much solid we add because the concentration implies the amount of dissolved substance. Hence, if we have solid, it doesn't dissolve in that substance, and the concentration in the solution will be the same. That's why the textbook states that adding more carbon to the solution will not change its concentration.
- What I don't understand is the next thing that is being stated: the concentration depends on the density, which is constant. I assume the author says that no matter how much carbon we add to the solution the density will stay the same. How can that be, or do I miss some basic understanding? Density is the mass/volume, i.e. how much of substance's particles are present in a given volume. If I add more carbon, I will increase the density, won't I?
- I would interpret the phrase 'concentration is constant' as 'after some solid has been formed, at a certain period, if that solid did dissolve to some extent, the concentration will become stable no matter how much additional solid is added'.
Please, help to understand this topic.
Thank you!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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They are referring to the concentration of the solid carbon, not the concentration of the carbon dissolved in the solution.
 
  • #3
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They are referring to the concentration of the solid carbon, not the concentration of the carbon dissolved in the solution.
Thank you for your reply! I am confused by the idea that no matter how much of carbon we add, the density stays the same. How can this be? Or am I reading the passage incorrectly?
 
  • #4
19,914
4,092
Thank you for your reply! I am confused by the idea that no matter how much of carbon we add, the density stays the same. How can this be? Or am I reading the passage incorrectly?
The density of the solid carbon stays the same (assuming that the carbon is considered incompressible).
 
  • #5
86
0
The density of the solid carbon stays the same (assuming that the carbon is considered incompressible).
I think I understand now, and see what has caused my confusion. Thank you!
 

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