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B How did Jupiter and Saturn disrupt our solar system

  1. Jan 10, 2018 at 6:16 AM #1

    wolram

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    This article suggests that exoplanets are the same size and have equal orbital spacing ,so what is different from our solar system.
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180109141918.htm

    An international research team led by Université de Montréal astrophysicist Lauren Weiss has discovered that exoplanets orbiting the same star tend to have similar sizes and a regular orbital spacing. This pattern, revealed by new W. M. Keck Observatory observations of planetary systems discovered by the Kepler Telescope, could suggest that most planetary systems have a different formation history than the solar system.
     
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  3. Jan 10, 2018 at 9:57 AM #2

    phyzguy

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    The disruption caused by Jupiter and Saturn getting into a 2:1 resonance is described by the Nice model.
     
  4. Jan 10, 2018 at 10:43 AM #3

    wolram

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    Thanks physguy, a second question, why are the exoplanets all relatively the same size and in stable orbits?
     
  5. Jan 10, 2018 at 10:48 AM #4

    phyzguy

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    I have no idea.
     
  6. Jan 10, 2018 at 3:45 PM #5
    Observational bias ?

    Doppler detection is biased towards finding 'hot Jupiters', and 'transit' method is restricted to the ~ 10% of systems with orbital plane serendipitously aligned...

    Okay, as Doppler sensitivity continues to improve, more, smaller and/or further planets show up as-is or in the 'residuals'. Although 'transit' sensitivity improves, too, a progressively smaller percentage are sufficiently planar to flag outer planets...

    Early days, yet !!

    FWIW, long ago, I read an early report on solar system formation simulations in Icarus. The results were a bit embarrassing as *none* came out looking like ours. Instead, a zoo. Large close, small far, wild mix common etc etc. With hindsight, they'd done better than they knew...
     
  7. Jan 10, 2018 at 5:15 PM #6

    stefan r

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    arxive article
    My impression from your article was that they were saying the solar system pattern is normal. What they do not find is something like Venus-Jupiter-Earth-Saturn. Systems with alternating giants small planets.

    Earth and Venus have very similar size. Kepler would have only seen the 4 inner planets. The ratios follow the general statistical pattern of larger planet outside of smaller. There are 3 ratios and Mars/Earth is the only one with smaller planet outside. So 67% of our inner planets follow the pattern unless you take earth/venus as rounded to equal in which case the solar system is 50%.
    The rocky planets of trappist 1 have similar size range as Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars:
    b = 0.79±0.27 M
    c= 1.63±0.63 M
    d= 0.33±0.15 M
    e= 0.24+0.56−0.24 M
    f = 0.36±0.12 M
    g = 0.566±0.038 M
    h = 0.086±0.084 M

    The spacing of the inner solar system is also very close to 1.5. Except for venus/mercury.
     
  8. Jan 11, 2018 at 4:00 AM #7

    wolram

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    Thank you Nik1223 and stephan r for your elucidation.
     
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