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How do fields change if there's no void

  1. Nov 13, 2009 #1
    If the value of a field at a point in space changes from (for simplicity) 2 to 5. Where is the space for the additional 3 found if there is already a field of x strength at every point?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 15, 2009 #2
    This is an interesting question I would like an answer to too. I am reading this:

    "One of the primary roles of the vacuum state in quantum field theory has been to serve as a physically distinguished reference state with respect to which other physical states can be defined and referred."
     
  4. Nov 16, 2009 #3
    roles of the vacuum state in quantum field theory has been to serve as a physically distinguished reference state

    I wonder if they use vacuum state as "close enough for our purposes" and so don't really need to look at the concept of void.
     
  5. Nov 16, 2009 #4

    Born2bwire

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    What do you mean additional space? A field does not take up any physical volume of space.
     
  6. Nov 16, 2009 #5
    My understand is obviously limited. But, if they say space is full of fields doesn't it follow that fields occupy a space? Besides, how can something have a location if the location does take up space?
     
  7. Nov 16, 2009 #6

    Born2bwire

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    No, a field does not take up a volume of space. There are no restrictions on the number or amplitude of fields in a given volume.
     
  8. Nov 17, 2009 #7
    a field does not take up a volume of space.

    This sounds counter intuitive. Is there a popular level book that talks about this?
     
  9. Nov 17, 2009 #8
    Don't fields just run touch other fields? fields on fields.
     
  10. Nov 17, 2009 #9

    Born2bwire

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    *shrug* Any physics textbook that involves electrodynamics should explain fields. It is a basic concept of physics. Griffiths Introduction to Electrodynamics is a good text.
     
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