How Do We Calculate Centrifugal Acceleration in Celestial Bodies?

In summary, the conversation is about calculating the centrifugal acceleration associated with the rotation of the Earth around its axis, and the Earth and the Sun moving around their center of mass. The formula for calculating centrifugal acceleration is discussed, and confusion about the difference between centrifugal and centripetal acceleration is mentioned. The speaker also asks for clarification on how to measure the acceleration at the equator, and how to use weight and distance in the calculations. The summarizer notes that this is a question of geometry, not physics, and suggests using information such as the length of the day and year to calculate the acceleration.
  • #1
johnq2k7
64
0
Calculate the centrifugal acceleration associated with

a.) The rotation of the Earth around its axis, as measured on the equator
b.) The Earth moving around the Earth-Sun centre of mass. Assume the orbit is circular
c._ The Sun moving around the Earth-Sun centre of mass. Same assumption as in b.)

Work shown...

i'm so confused with centrifugal and centripetal acceleration... but this question is asking for 'centrifugal' accel.

for a.) i did a_z= (omega^2)*(x)
where omega= sqrt (G*(M+m))/(r^3))

i don't understand how measure this since it's at the equator

for b.) do i simply use the weight of the earth, earth, and distance from the Earth to the sun.. and sub in

for c>0 do i simply use the weight of the sun, earth, and distance from the Earth to the sun.. and if so what's the difference

need a lot of help here.. please help!



 
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  • #2
Hi johnq2k7! :smile:
johnq2k7 said:
Calculate the centrifugal acceleration associated with

a.) The rotation of the Earth around its axis, as measured on the equator
b.) The Earth moving around the Earth-Sun centre of mass. Assume the orbit is circular
c._ The Sun moving around the Earth-Sun centre of mass. Same assumption as in b.)

Work shown...

i'm so confused with centrifugal and centripetal acceleration... but this question is asking for 'centrifugal' accel.

"Centrifugal" just means the opposite of centripetal … it's a daft way of asking the question, like "A rocket is launched into space: what is its speed downwards?" :rolleyes:
for a.) i did a_z= (omega^2)*(x)
where omega= sqrt (G*(M+m))/(r^3))

i don't understand how measure this since it's at the equator

for b.) do i simply use the weight of the earth, earth, and distance from the Earth to the sun.. and sub in

for c>0 do i simply use the weight of the sun, earth, and distance from the Earth to the sun.. and if so what's the difference

no, this is geometry, not physics …

you're not asked why is there acceleration (gravity etc), only what is the acceleration …

for that, you only need to know the length of the day and the year (and you can look that up in a diary :wink:), and the distances involved. :smile:
 

Related to How Do We Calculate Centrifugal Acceleration in Celestial Bodies?

1. What is centrifugal force?

Centrifugal force is the outward force that occurs when an object is moving in a circular motion. It is a fictitious force that appears to be acting on an object, but is actually a result of the object's inertia trying to keep it moving in a straight line.

2. How is centrifugal force different from centripetal force?

Centrifugal force and centripetal force are often confused, but they are actually two different forces. Centrifugal force is the outward force that appears to be acting on an object in circular motion, while centripetal force is the inward force that is actually responsible for keeping the object moving in a circular path.

3. Does centrifugal force really exist?

Centrifugal force is often referred to as a "fictitious force" because it is only experienced by an object in a non-inertial reference frame. In reality, it is not a true force, but rather a result of the object's inertia.

4. How is centrifugal force calculated?

The magnitude of centrifugal force can be calculated using the formula F = m * v^2 / r, where F is the force, m is the mass of the object, v is the velocity of the object, and r is the radius of the circular path. However, it is important to note that this is not a real force, but rather a mathematical calculation based on the object's motion.

5. What are some real-life examples of centrifugal force?

Centrifugal force can be observed in many everyday situations, such as when a car turns a corner and passengers feel pulled to the side, or when a spinning top wobbles as it loses its balance. It is also used in various industrial processes, such as separating cream from milk in a centrifuge.

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