How do we maintain a system in a non-dertministic state?

In summary, the article discusses how to create quantum entanglement, how long it can last, and how it can be collapsed.
  • #1
Grinkle
Gold Member
772
223
@mfb From this thread -

https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...ract-with-the-particle-in-double-slit.949489/

Post #2 -

"It is not feasible to keep such a large and especially a biological object in a state without measurement"

How does one keep a multi-particle system in a state where no 'measurement' or interaction occur to cause the system to show to a deterministic state? What is practical limit and what is the bottleneck in being able to keep yet more complicated systems in a non-deterministic state?

I don't know how to word the question properly. I hope its clear what I am asking. I wanted to use the word collapse but I don't know how to use it properly so I avoided it.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Some quantum entangled systems usually remain so for 90us or so. This limits the number of operations that can be performed before it decays and you lose your answer.

In this report of a few years ago they got to 10ms for two qubits:

https://phys.org/news/2015-09-entanglement-lifetime-magnitude-coupled-cavities.html

Im sure they've extended it beyond the 10ms but don't have a good reference for it.

Here's a Forbes article that may have more details on the lifetimes:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chador...you-create-quantum-entanglement/#ef23c5e1732b
 
  • Like
Likes Grinkle
  • #3
@jedishrfu Thanks for the articles. One thing I take away from these articles is that keeping particles in an entangled condition (I hope that is the right way to describe it) necessarily implies suspending or destroying any macro-level function the particles may have once had. So quantum bits are feasible because suspending their functionality (keeping them from being either 0 or 1) is the whole point. More complicated systems than a bit don't even have conceptual existence in a state of entanglement, because their macro-existence requires interaction of individual particles.

So its relevant to ask how many Q-bits can be entangled with each other and how long can that entanglement be sustained - these are valid engineering questions.

But beyond Q-bits and how many Q-bits, there really isn't anything meaningful to consider - is this a sound perspective? For example, the idea of a cat in a state of superposition between alive and dead is not at all meaningful, if a cats particles are all entangled, one no longer has a cat in the first place.
 
  • #4
Grinkle said:
For example, the idea of a cat in a state of superposition between alive and dead is not at all meaningful, if a cats particles are all entangled, one no longer has a cat in the first place.
Yeah, basically.

The relevant concept here is decoherence. If you just let the wave function evolve you can get a superposition of things where there is no chance to ever bring them to interfere again. In that case the states are decoherent. Collapse interpretations then claim all but one part of this superposition magically vanish. MWI says they continue as independent "worlds". Other interpretations have other ways to look at this.
 
  • Like
Likes dlgoff and Demystifier

1. How do we define a non-deterministic state in a system?

A non-deterministic state in a system is a state where the outcome or behavior of the system cannot be predicted with 100% certainty. This can be due to factors such as random events, external influences, or complex interactions within the system itself.

2. Why is it important to maintain a non-deterministic state in a system?

Maintaining a non-deterministic state in a system allows for flexibility and adaptability. It allows the system to respond to changing conditions and unexpected inputs, making it more resilient and less prone to errors or failures.

3. What are some techniques for maintaining a non-deterministic state in a system?

Some techniques for maintaining a non-deterministic state in a system include introducing randomness or variability into the system, using feedback loops to adjust behavior, and implementing algorithms that can handle uncertainty or unexpected inputs.

4. How do we ensure the stability and reliability of a non-deterministic system?

To ensure the stability and reliability of a non-deterministic system, it is important to have thorough testing and validation processes in place. This can involve simulating various scenarios and inputs, as well as monitoring and analyzing the system's behavior in real-world conditions.

5. Can a system be entirely non-deterministic?

No, it is not possible for a system to be entirely non-deterministic. There will always be some level of predictability and control that can be achieved through proper design, implementation, and management of the system. However, incorporating non-deterministic elements can improve the overall functionality and resilience of the system.

Similar threads

Replies
1
Views
616
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
24
Views
1K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
4
Views
637
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
1
Views
922
Replies
50
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
630
Replies
6
Views
761
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
7
Views
991
Back
Top