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How do you indicate transient terms when y just equals 1 ?

  1. Jan 28, 2013 #1
    how do you "indicate transient terms" when y just equals 1 ?

    t is the dependent variable in this problem and I'm told to "indicate transient terms". Well, t=1 so is this a trick question or did I do something wrong?


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    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 28, 2013 #2

    HallsofIvy

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    Re: how do you "indicate transient terms" when y just equals 1 ?

    You seem to have forgotten the "constant of integration". t= 1 is one function satisfying this equation. There are others, involving terms that go to 0 as t goes to infinity.
     
  4. Jan 28, 2013 #3
    Re: how do you "indicate transient terms" when y just equals 1 ?

    ok, so t = 1 + c
    or t = 1 + c/μ ?
    Because the c term should've actually been introduced on the 2nd to last line. If that's true, that e^((e^x^2)/2) function should've also been divided by c when solving for t.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
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