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How much Energy exacltly is an MeV?

  1. Sep 16, 2009 #1
    Hi Readers,

    Can anybody just tell me how much energy really 1MeV will be? Curious to know because seen a lot of powerful things like cars, tools, heavy machinery, jet engines, laser cutters and i have an idea of their power in terms of respective units. Wondering how much energy will 1MeV really carry? Please make me understand in simple way!!!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 16, 2009 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    1 MeV = 106 eV = 1.6 x 10-13 Joules. Not so much, but then again, elementary particles are rather small. :wink: See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_volt" [Broken]

    For comparision: If a one pound object falls about one foot, it would gain about 1.4 Joules of energy.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Sep 16, 2009 #3
    For electron velocity it means v ≈ 0.87*c.
     
  5. Sep 16, 2009 #4
    Thank you very much for that explanation! I wonder how much energy is released when One MT nuclear weapon is detonated!!!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 16, 2009
  6. Sep 16, 2009 #5
    I believe 1 megaton is on the order of 1015 joules
     
  7. Sep 16, 2009 #6
    Explain this for me please!!!!
     
  8. Sep 17, 2009 #7

    arivero

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    Gold Member

    Two interesting rods here are:

    - how many GeVs is one unit of atomic mass?
    - how many MeVs do you get from the fusion Deuterium->Helium?
     
  9. Sep 17, 2009 #8

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    He means that if an electron had a total energy of 1 MeV, it would be moving at that speed. The speed is expressed as a fraction of c, the speed of light, which acts as a "speed limit" for all massive particles.

    If an electron at rest (which already has some energy due to its mass) were to be given an additional 1 MeV of kinetic energy, it would end up moving at about 0.94*c.
     
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