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How much weight could this hold?

  1. Jun 17, 2015 #1
    Hello everyone, this is my first time here and I was wondering if you could help.

    I would like to know if there is a way of calculating how much weight this simple component could hold. It will be made from mild steel.

    TIA

    Scott
     

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  3. Jun 17, 2015 #2

    phinds

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    How would you go about figuring that out?
     
  4. Jun 17, 2015 #3

    berkeman

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    Welcome to the PF.

    What do you mean by holding weight? In which axis? In compression or in tension? What is the application? (hopefully not for a balcony in Berkeley...)
     
  5. Jun 17, 2015 #4
    Sorry I should of added more detail. Imagine it's a chain link vertically, and it's under tension.
     
  6. Jun 17, 2015 #5

    berkeman

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    What is the application?
     
  7. Jun 17, 2015 #6
    Sorry I meant horizontally, I'm really tired tonight lol. It's part of a slackline setup.
     
  8. Jun 17, 2015 #7

    berkeman

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  9. Jun 17, 2015 #8
    Erm..not quite lol. I hope it wouldn't combust.
     
  10. Jun 17, 2015 #9

    berkeman

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    The problem is, we can't discuss potentially dangerous activities here on the PF (that's in the Rules link at the top of the page under Info). If you don't have the background to do the calculation yourself, it's probably not a good idea for you to be trying to make a DIY slackline setup. Aren't there commercially available slackline setups that have different weight ratings?
     
  11. Jun 17, 2015 #10
    I thought there might be some materials software for working out things like this. I know this would take plenty of tension, I just wondered if I could work out how much.

    If I compare the dimensions to avaliable items, this is overkill (comparison with a quick link for example).
     
  12. Jun 17, 2015 #11

    SteamKing

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    Can't tell how much this piece will hold ... there's no diameter shown for the holes nor their location relative to the sides of the piece.
     
  13. Jun 17, 2015 #12
    Sorry, forgot to add those in. Here is an amended pic.
     

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  14. Jun 18, 2015 #13
    Is it possible to calculate now you have dimensions?
     
  15. Jun 19, 2015 #14

    Lok

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    Now for a quickie eyeballing (which you should never ever do without testing the part afterwards) calculation.

    The thinnest section is a cut out through a hole and has a surface Area of 25*(9+9)=450mm^2.
    Now the worst construction steel in the world S185 (there could be something worse than this) has a Yield Strength of 175-185N/mm^2.
    That would give a 8 metric tonnes. So With a safety factor of 4 (as clearly you will be next to it in use) you could say it has a maximum strength of 2 tonnes.
    All the above are with loads of assumptions.

    Because Engineering is more about practice in hopes of avoiding the math, never use a part in a life threatening situation that has not been subjected to failure testing. Not sure how considering the strength of it.
    Also if you know your mild steels yield strength you could do the math again and get a more real result.
     
  16. Jun 19, 2015 #15
    Wow, thanks Lok. That's a great answer.

    Would you mind explaining the (25*(9+9)=450mm^2).

    I find this really interesting, I'll have to read more on the subject. I assume the size of the pin that passes through the hole makes a difference too?
     
  17. Jun 19, 2015 #16

    berkeman

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    Thread closed temporarily for Moderation...
     
  18. Jun 19, 2015 #17

    berkeman

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    Since this thread could involve life safety, it will remain closed.
     
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