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How should unwashed shop bought salads be washed

  1. Jul 5, 2012 #1
    When I prepare a shop bought salad just for myself I cut it up,chuck it on a plate(sometimes I don't bother with cutting up or with the plate) and get stuck in.Yummy yum yum.When I prepare for others as well for myself I wash the salad.My washing method involves bunging the salad in a collander,running it under the cold water tap for a few seconds and then shaking off the excess water.
    I wonder if this washing method works,does it rid the salad of any nasties?I suspect that it doesn't work very effectively at all and that in order to ensure that no one later suffers with the tummy trots a more thorough washing method is needed.My question is how ,if at all,should salad be washed?
     
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  3. Jul 5, 2012 #2

    jedishrfu

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  4. Jul 5, 2012 #3

    lisab

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    :eek: I don't think a salad would withstand boiling hot water.

    I usually rinse salads and dry in a salad spinner - brilliant invention, those salad spinners! I recognize there is a chance of getting nasties but the benefits of fresh greens outweigh the risk, IMO.
     
  5. Jul 5, 2012 #4
    Thanks jedishfru and lisab.I think I will invest in a salad spinner.
     
  6. Jul 5, 2012 #5

    turbo

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    They are great. You can remove the basket and rinse the greens in your sink. Shake the basket to get rid of most of the water, then put it back in the spinner and spin away.
     
  7. Jul 5, 2012 #6

    jedishrfu

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    leave the basket in the spinner and soak the veggies, then pull out the spinner and use the soaking water for your plants then place the basket back inside and spin. Dont forget to wash the basket... with soap to remove any bacteria before drying off and putting it away.
     
  8. Jul 5, 2012 #7
    I didn't know they existed until lisab's post.They don't seem to be very common here in the UK(if they are I've missed them) but by searching I found some stockists,including IKEA.
     
  9. Jul 5, 2012 #8
    I'm usually very good with the washing up mainly because my wife does it.Well I do most of the prep and cooking so it is a fair division of labour.
     
  10. Jul 5, 2012 #9

    turbo

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    My wife bought one with two different-sized baskets. I think she bought it at a Pampered Chef party that my cousin's daughter hosted. It is a great tool. We grow broccoli in our garden, and soak it in salt water to drive out any cabbage-worms. Then dump the broccoli into the spinner basket in the sink and rinse the salt out with cold water and spin the water out. I love making stir-fries with broccoli, and the spinner is a very fast and efficient way to get the broccoli heads dried so they won't cool off the wok.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2012
  11. Jul 10, 2012 #10
    We are now proud owners of a salad spinner.The spinner was purchased at approximately four thirty P.M. on July 6 at Tesco Extra near Romford and came in at just under four pounds(sterling).Both purchaser and spinner are doing well.
     
  12. Jul 10, 2012 #11

    turbo

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    Good deal! Like preparing broccoli and drying it before adding it to a stir-fry, you'll find uses for that spinner that goes beyond making garden salads.
     
  13. Jul 10, 2012 #12

    lisab

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    Awwww, they're so cute when they're brand new *sniff*!
     
  14. Jul 10, 2012 #13

    turbo

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    Look at that little face! How much it nose!
     
  15. Jul 10, 2012 #14

    Pythagorean

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    Our safety officer on campus told us that it's mostly the mechanical aspect of washing that removes bacteria from your hands (i.e. those waterless hand sanitizers are pointless). So I'd think a rinse is good enough for most veggies.
     
  16. Jul 10, 2012 #15

    turbo

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    BTW, my wife and I love fresh grapes and cherries, and the salad-spinner is a quick and easy way to dry them after rinsing. That critter gets used a lot.

    It is easy enough to dump those fruits into a colander and let them drain over time, but when a relative pulls into the drive unannounced and they have a kid that loves fruit finger-food, the salad spinner gets you into business really quickly. I have a young niece that will gladly graze on carrot sticks, celery sticks, cherries, and grapes while I grill up steaks and burgers for my brother and others.

    It's not just for salads anymore. (Parody of a US commercial ad.)
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2012
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