How to Calculate Absolute Error in Moles for an Acid-Base Titration Experiment?

In summary, to calculate the absolute error of an experiment in moles of acids when given 18.59 +/- 0.02mL of a 12.85 +/- 0.03M NaOH solution that will be neutralized with an unknown acid, you can use the equation (greatest possible error - maximum error). However, make sure to convert mL to M if necessary.
  • #1
thinktank75
19
0
How do you calculate the absolute error of an experiment (in moles of acides) when you are given:

18.59 +/-0.02mL of a 12.85 +/ 0.03M NaOh solution that is going to be neutralized with an unknown acid?

I'm not sure how to plug it into the equation, or I may be using the wrong equation.
Thanks:smile:
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I took the greatest possible error (18.59 + 12.85) then subtracted it by the maximum error (18.59 + 0.02) + (12.85 + 0.03) but i keep getting the wrong answer, am I suppose to convert the mL to M? (they're both different, but I can't find the mL for NaOh since I don't have the moles) ...
 
  • #3


To calculate the absolute error in this experiment, you will need to use the formula for absolute error, which is the absolute value of the difference between the measured value and the true value. In this case, the measured value is 18.59 +/- 0.02 mL and the true value is 12.85 +/- 0.03 M.

First, calculate the absolute error in volume by subtracting the lower bound (18.59 - 0.02 = 18.57) from the upper bound (18.59 + 0.02 = 18.61). This gives you a range of 18.57 - 18.61 mL for the volume. Since we are looking for the absolute value, we can take the average of these two values, which is 18.59 mL.

Next, calculate the absolute error in concentration by subtracting the lower bound (12.85 - 0.03 = 12.82) from the upper bound (12.85 + 0.03 = 12.88). This gives you a range of 12.82 - 12.88 M for the concentration. Again, taking the average of these two values gives you 12.85 M.

To calculate the absolute error in moles of acid, you will need to use the formula for molarity (M = moles of solute / liters of solution). Rearranging this equation, we get moles of solute = M x liters of solution. Therefore, the absolute error in moles of acid will be the absolute value of the difference between the upper and lower bounds for the moles of NaOH, which is 12.85 M x 18.59 mL - 12.85 M x 18.61 mL = 0.03 moles.

In summary, the absolute error in moles of acid for this experiment is 0.03 moles. It is important to note that this calculation assumes that the uncertainties in volume and concentration are independent and do not affect each other. If this is not the case, a more complex method such as propagation of uncertainty may need to be used to calculate the absolute error.
 

Related to How to Calculate Absolute Error in Moles for an Acid-Base Titration Experiment?

What is absolute error and how is it calculated?

Absolute error is a measure of the amount of deviation between the actual value and the measured value. It is calculated by taking the absolute value of the difference between the actual value and the measured value.

How is absolute error different from relative error?

Absolute error measures the actual deviation in numerical terms while relative error measures the deviation in percentage terms. Absolute error is useful for comparing the accuracy of different measurements, while relative error is useful for comparing the accuracy of measurements to the actual value.

What are the units of absolute error?

The units of absolute error are the same as the units of the measured value. For example, if a length is measured in meters, the absolute error will also be in meters.

How can absolute error be minimized?

Absolute error can be minimized by using more precise measuring instruments, taking multiple measurements and averaging them, and reducing sources of error such as human error or equipment limitations.

Can absolute error be negative?

No, absolute error cannot be negative since it is calculated by taking the absolute value of the difference between the actual value and the measured value. This ensures that the result is always a positive value.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
4K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
16
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
Back
Top