How to Calculate the Mean Fraction of Occupied Seats in a Row?

In summary: If the seating ends after any number of seats are filled, the mean fraction of empty seats will be the number of filled seats divided by the number of seats available.
  • #1
dumsek
2
0
There are a set of kids (let's say N=50) asked to sit in a row of seats, leaving at least one empty seat between them until all seats are filled. At the end, how do I calculate mean of the fraction of occupied seats? What will be the input to calculate mean?
 
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  • #2
I am not sure you have all the information needed.
Do they leave 1 seat empty, or perhaps more than 1?
What does it mean for all seats to be filled? Does that mean there is someone in the first seat and someone in either the last or first to last seat and lots of gaps in between?
Do you know either the total number of seats or the odds of skipping more than one seat?
The mean is similar to the expected value...think of the sum over all options: (# of occupied seats) x (probability of that number).
 
  • #3
there must be at least one seat empty between any two kids. They can sit in anyway until all seat are taken.
 
  • #4
So, there might be 1 or 2 seats empty, but if 3 empty seats, then not all seats are taken, since another kid could fit?
Or are there unlimited seats available, so between any two kids there might be an unlimited number of seats?
Ultimately, if you are asking to find a fraction of occupied seats, that will be # taken / # total.
If one seat available, mean fraction is 1.00.
If two seats available, mean fraction is .5
If 3 seats available, you have 2/3 full in 2 of 3 cases, and 1/3 in one of the three cases (first person sits in the 2nd seat), for a mean seat fraction of 5/9.
I am still not clear what your actual problem is, if it is one where the seats are the limiter, then it will end up being some function of seats available. If student numbers is the limiter, then it will be students/seats. If seats are unlimited, and seats between are unlimited, then you need to have some sort of probability distribution for how many seats are left between kids.
 
  • #5
dumsek said:
There are a set of kids (let's say N=50) asked to sit in a row of seats, leaving at least one empty seat between them until all seats are filled. At the end, how do I calculate mean of the fraction of occupied seats? What will be the input to calculate mean?

If the seating continues "until all seats are filled" in the row, the mean fraction of empty seats will be zero.
 

Related to How to Calculate the Mean Fraction of Occupied Seats in a Row?

What is "Mean for seat allocation"?

"Mean for seat allocation" is a statistical method used to determine the average number of seats that should be allocated to different groups or individuals based on certain criteria.

How is the mean calculated for seat allocation?

To calculate the mean for seat allocation, you would first determine the total number of seats available. Then, you would divide this number by the number of groups or individuals to be allocated seats, giving you the average number of seats per group or individual.

What factors are considered when using the mean for seat allocation?

The mean for seat allocation takes into account various factors such as the total number of seats available, the number of groups or individuals to be allocated seats, and any specific criteria or preferences for seat allocation.

What are the advantages of using the mean for seat allocation?

Using the mean for seat allocation can help ensure fairness and equity in the distribution of seats. It also allows for a systematic and objective approach to seat allocation, rather than relying on personal biases or preferences.

Are there any limitations to using the mean for seat allocation?

One limitation of using the mean for seat allocation is that it assumes all groups or individuals have equal needs or requirements for seats. It may also not take into account other important factors such as diversity or representation within a group.

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