How to find a force at a different angle?

In summary: I think I will have to bow out. I don't know anything about moments.In summary, the conversation is discussing how to find the component of the force acting at point C which is perpendicular to the line CP. The resulting moment is to be compared with a calculation in part (ii), looking at the force alone. The homework equations involve using cosine for the x component and sine for the y component. The attempt at a solution involves drawing a diagram and determining the angle and magnitude of the components. However, there is some doubt about the accuracy of the diagram and the calculations, as the resulting moments using two different methods are not equal. The full question has not been provided, so it is difficult to determine the correctness of the numbers
  • #1
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Homework Statement


By finding angles, determine the component of the force acting at C which is perpendicular to the line CP. Show that the resulting moment agrees with the calculation in part (ii), if you were to look at that force alone.

Force at C = 200Ni + 250Nj (calculated to be at an angle 75.96 angle from x axis)
Force C magnitude = 320.156N



Homework Equations



Simple cos for x component and sin for y component, etc.



The Attempt at a Solution



This is part c of a problem. I have calculated that the line perpendicular to CP is 87.138 degrees off the x axis. So how do I find the component acting at that angle?

I feel like this is really easy and I'm just overthinking things.

I don't want the answer to the problem which is why I left out where the origin for the moment will be. I just want to know how to find this force.
 
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  • #2
Kalookakoo said:

Homework Statement


By finding angles, determine the component of the force acting at C which is perpendicular to the line CP. Show that the resulting moment agrees with the calculation in part (ii), if you were to look at that force alone.

Force at C = 200Ni + 250Nj (calculated to be at an angle 75.96 angle from x axis)
Force C magnitude = 320.156N



Homework Equations



Simple cos for x component and sin for y component, etc.



The Attempt at a Solution



This is part c of a problem. I have calculated that the line perpendicular to CP is 87.138 degrees off the x axis. So how do I find the component acting at that angle?

I feel like this is really easy and I'm just overthinking things.

I don't want the answer to the problem which is why I left out where the origin for the moment will be. I just want to know how to find this force.

Have you drawn a reasonably accurate diagram?
 
  • #4
Kalookakoo said:
Here's the diagram.

http://i.imgur.com/4yGeT.png

OK, that looks like the supplied diagram.

Have you added in any lines of your own - like the line CP, then the components of the force parallel and perpendicular to that line?

Once they are drawn, you should be able to calculate what you are after.
 
  • #5
I have it drawn out but I'm stuck though it seems obvious...

I mean, it's just those 2 vectors with that theta in between. But you can't find the other magnitude with just one angle and one vector...

Or do the two connect at their tips to form a right angle of some sort?
 
  • #6
Kalookakoo said:

Homework Statement


By finding angles, determine the component of the force acting at C which is perpendicular to the line CP. Show that the resulting moment agrees with the calculation in part (ii), if you were to look at that force alone.

Force at C = 200Ni + 250Nj (calculated to be at an angle 75.96 angle from x axis)
Force C magnitude = 320.156N



Homework Equations



Simple cos for x component and sin for y component, etc.



The Attempt at a Solution



This is part c of a problem. I have calculated that the line perpendicular to CP is 87.138 degrees off the x axis. So how do I find the component acting at that angle?

I feel like this is really easy and I'm just overthinking things.

I don't want the answer to the problem which is why I left out where the origin for the moment will be. I just want to know how to find this force.

Your statement in red, above, is true for finding the x- and y-components. You will be using the the etc part of the statement.

The Force vector forms some angle with the direction you seek - let's call it θ.

The value of the component will be either Fc.cosθ or Fc.sinθ

One of those values will be much bigger that the other.

If you have a carefully drawn diagram, you will be able to see if it is the perpendicular or parallel component that is bigger - thus you know which component is which.

Of course, if your diagram is so approximate that you draw the angles bearing little resemblance to their real values then you will be in great doubt about which one is which.
 
  • #7
Ahh I see now. I have a bad habit of not drawing diagrams or not doing them well enough to scale. Thanks for the help.
 
  • #8
And I got the wrong answer. My moments from that point using the two methods are not equal.

I found the moment using x and y components timers perpendicular distance is equal to 52000.

Using the second method, I found it to be 63879.

I feel like I did the first method fine.

For the second method I found the perpendicular angle to be 87.138 with a force magnitude of 319.7569N. The distance between point P and point C I found to be 200.2498m.

Are those numbers correct>
 
  • #10
Supplying the whole question rather than the end parts makes us see the whole picture.
 

1. What is the formula for calculating force at a different angle?

The formula for calculating force at a different angle is F = m x a x sinθ, where m is the mass, a is the acceleration, and θ is the angle between the force vector and the direction of motion.

2. How do I find the magnitude of the force at a different angle?

To find the magnitude of the force at a different angle, you can use the Pythagorean theorem. First, calculate the horizontal and vertical components of the force using the given angle. Then, use the formula F = √(Fx² + Fy²) to find the magnitude.

3. Can I use trigonometry to find the force at a different angle?

Yes, you can use trigonometry to find the force at a different angle. The sine and cosine functions can be used to calculate the vertical and horizontal components of the force, respectively.

4. How does the angle affect the force?

The angle between the force vector and the direction of motion affects the magnitude and direction of the force. If the angle is 0 or 180 degrees, the force will be in the same direction as the direction of motion. As the angle increases, the force will have a greater component in the perpendicular direction and a smaller component in the direction of motion.

5. What units are used to measure force at a different angle?

The unit of force is Newtons (N). However, when calculating force at a different angle, the units may vary depending on the given variables. For example, if the mass is given in kilograms and the acceleration in meters per second squared, the force will be in Newtons. If the mass is given in grams and the acceleration in centimeters per second squared, the force will be in dynes.

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