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How to find the Atomic Structure of a Constituent

  1. Jun 29, 2009 #1
    For a project/idea I'm working on, I need to find the charge density of tap water. I've read that this can be determined by simply subtracting total protons minus total electrons. I've got a list of elements that are in the water, but I'm not 100% sure how to find the exact number of electrons and protons for everything. Elements such as Calcium are easy to find, but then Bicarbonate? I've googled and can't seem to find it. If someone can point me in the right direction, it would be great!

    Constituent:

    Calcium
    Magnesium
    Sodium
    Potassium
    Bicarbonate
    Sulfate
    Chloride
    Fluoride
    Bromide
    Silica
    Nitrite
    Ammonia
    Phosphorus (dissolved)
    Aluminum
    Arsenic
    Barium
    Beryllium
    Boron
    Cadmium
    Chromium
    Cobalt
    Iron (dissolved)
    Lead
    Lithium
    Manganese
    Selenium
    Strontium
    Vanadium


    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 30, 2009 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Water is neutral, so the charge density is zero.
     
  4. Jun 30, 2009 #3
    H2O is neutral, but with all the ions in the water, there has to be something. Even an insignificant amount would still mean something to me.
     
  5. Jun 30, 2009 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Solutions are neutral as well. Exactly the same amount of positive and negative ions are dissolved.
     
  6. Jun 30, 2009 #5

    chemisttree

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    Science Advisor
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    Gold Member

    That's a very unusual definition. Where did you see it?
     
  7. Jun 30, 2009 #6

    I got it from a textbook I have. The section talks about tachmen and uses a Tortoises-Hares fable to explain it. Really crummy section, the rest of the book is okay. So I was just going off of the one sentence I quoted below.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=LZ...s+and+Electrodynamics&client=firefox-a&pgis=1

    Do you have any better "definitions" on how to calculate charge density? This is the only thing I am stumped on.
     
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