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How to find wavelenght of a 3m spring with 2,5 Hz?

  • Thread starter kontorstol
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Hi! I just can't figure this out.

A 3m long spring makes transverse waves with a 2,5 Hz frequency. What is the wavelength?

I don't even know where to start, because in out incredible small physics course, we never learned this. :)
 
Are these all the data you have? Does it say if the spring is fixed at its ends? Does it say if it's the fundamental armonic?
 
Thats all the info. The only formula have have learned is λ = v/f, and that won't work here after what I can see. There are four options after the question:

a) 0.67m
b) 3.75m
c) 1.5m
d) 6m
 
All right, then I think you have to assume that the spring is fixed at both its ends. Then you have a formula that states that only some particoular waves can occour in that spring (its armonics). Have you ever heard or seen this formula?
 

BvU

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Hello Konto, and welcome to PF. There must be more to this. Is there a preceding question that is continued in this one ?
If you can't find anything there, all I can advise is to look up (google) images of standing waves and see if you get some inspiration there....
 
130
6
you should check out other data that they gave you. This way, it's just impossible to understand. :)
 
First of all, sorry for not using the right template etc. when posting this topic. I will do better in future topics.

All right, then I think you have to assume that the spring is fixed at both its ends. Then you have a formula that states that only some particoular waves can occour in that spring (its armonics). Have you ever heard or seen this formula?
I have never heard about any other formula for finding wavelength than λ = v/f. We don't even have a book in physics, all the info we need is in a 75 page long compendium that the teacher made for the 6 week course, and the compendium never mentions such a formula.

Hello Konto, and welcome to PF. There must be more to this. Is there a preceding question that is continued in this one ?
If you can't find anything there, all I can advise is to look up (google) images of standing waves and see if you get some inspiration there....
This was the first question. :( I found a picture that was suppose to go with the question (didn't get printed). Maybe that can help?
 

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Yes the picture is extremely useful because tell us that the spring is fixed at its end and the wave is its fourth armonic. There are a lot of beautiful videos that could help you understandig what we are talking about: try searching on YouTube stationary waves.
The formula anyway says that [tex] \lambda = \frac{2L}{n} [/tex] where L is the length of the spring and n the number of the armonic.
It's an interesting stuff, expecially if you are interested in music, so I suggest you to try to understand it on your own, or even better ask your teacher for some useful sources :)
 
Well thats great news, thank you so much. :) Now I'll just have to ask the teacher why he would make a question that we never could figure out if we only look at the compendium. :)
 

BvU

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Looks as if you can now answer the question by just looking at the picture: how many wavelengths do you see ?
 
Looks as if you can now answer the question by just looking at the picture: how many wavelengths do you see ?
Wow, I did not realize that. :) Thanks for opening my eyes. :)
 

BvU

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Just to be sure I didn't wrong-foot you: what is your conclusion?
 
λ = 2*3m/4 = 1,5m :)
 

BvU

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Looks like the right answer to me !
 

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