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How to increase oxidation in something

  1. Sep 12, 2016 #1
    Not sure if this is Chemistry or not, but how would one increase oxidation in an object?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2016 #2

    Borek

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    Define "increase oxidation in an object". As worded this statement doesn't make sense.
     
  4. Sep 12, 2016 #3
    Sorry, I meant increase the rate of oxidation in an object.
     
  5. Sep 12, 2016 #4

    Fervent Freyja

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    Increasing the oxidation state means that it would need to continue losing electrons. How to do that depends upon the "object" that you are wondering about, as there various oxidants that can be used. Can you be more specific?
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2016
  6. Sep 12, 2016 #5

    Borek

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    I am afraid it still absurdly ambiguous.

    "Rate of oxidation in an object" can be the speed at which wood is burnt in my fireplace, speed at which the fuel is consumed in a car engine, the speed at which battery works, or the speed at which I am burning glucose when riding on a bike (plus some).

    Do you see why it is not possible to even try to answer your question?
     
  7. Sep 12, 2016 #6

    Fervent Freyja

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    Going through some terminology here may be of assistance for you. The term oxidation already implies a change by its very definition, so your question does carry a sort of roundabout meaning. I did still attempt to understand what you are trying to ask though. This term is probably best used in the context of atoms or molecules (not macroscopic objects).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redox
     
  8. Sep 12, 2016 #7
    Immerse your object into (as best as can be achieved), 100% pure Oxygen?.
    Maybe then heat it up with lasers?
     
  9. Sep 13, 2016 #8
    Yes! thank you rootone! ( sorry about my lack of chemistry knowledg to y'all)
     
  10. Sep 13, 2016 #9

    Fervent Freyja

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    ...careful not to heat an oxygen tank up with a laser, it could explode.
     
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