Human Vampiric Virus: Facts & Info

In summary, there is a virus that has been found in fleas that commonly parasitize cave-dwelling bats. However, the virus is not directly related to the bats' feeding habits, and it is unclear if the virus can successfully reproduce in a new host. There is also a source provided for more information on this topic.
  • #1
bioquest
319
0
I heard the virus' natural host is a flea commonly found on cave-dwelling bats, especially the vampire bat. Is this an actual virus, is there any info about it?
 
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  • #2
Could you please post the source - I'd love to see who came up with this one.
Unlees I misunderstand what you are saying...

Yes there are mites and fleas which prefer to parasitize just a single species of bats.
But the vampire bat's feeding habits have NOTHING to do with a virus infection changing what/how they eat.

Ever been bitten by one? I have. There's a lovely 45 year old scar on my forearm to prove it. The bite is painless, and continues to bleed long after Mr Bat takes off.
The bat has evolved over long periods of time to be able to open a wound and lap up blood successfully. A big part of that feeding strategy is not getting killed while feeding.

And it is possible for a bat to transmit a virus during feeding. Whether the virus can reproduce in the new host is extremely problematic.
 
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  • #3
I was just wondering if there was anything like this/if there was this
It doesn't sound too unreasonable...that fleas could transmit a virus that could cause you to go into a coma and have other effects

http://www.fvza.org/science1.html
 

Related to Human Vampiric Virus: Facts & Info

What is the Human Vampiric Virus (HVV)?

The Human Vampiric Virus (HVV) is a fictional virus that appears in various works of fiction, particularly in vampire-themed stories. It is not a real virus and has no scientific basis or evidence of its existence.

How is the HVV transmitted?

Since the HVV is not a real virus, there is no known method of transmission. In vampire-themed stories, it is often portrayed as being transmitted through a bite or exchange of bodily fluids with a vampire, but this is purely fictional and not based on any scientific evidence.

What are the symptoms of HVV?

As the HVV is not a real virus, there are no documented symptoms. In fiction, it is often portrayed as causing changes in physical appearance, such as pale skin and fangs, as well as heightened senses and a craving for blood. However, these are purely fictional and not based on any scientific evidence.

Is there a cure for HVV?

Since HVV is not a real virus, there is no known cure. In fiction, there are often stories of a cure being discovered or created, but these are purely fictional and not based on any scientific evidence.

Can someone become a real vampire from HVV?

No, as the HVV is not a real virus, it cannot turn someone into a real vampire. Vampires are fictional creatures created for storytelling purposes and do not exist in real life. Any transformations or abilities associated with vampires in fiction are not scientifically possible.

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