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I can taste the plastic I drink water from

  1. Apr 12, 2009 #1
    If the water stays in a plastic bottle for a while, I can taste the plastic in it. Plastic flavor. The taste is as it smells. Have any of you ever noticed this? Am I actually drinking plastic?

    I don't find this taste in glasses or ceramic or metal. But it's definitely in the plastic and it's very gross.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 12, 2009 #2
    My guess would be that the flavour has more to do with it sitting for a while, rather than the plastic. When you drink water from a glass, you most likely drink it reasonably quickly.

    As an experiment, try to get a glass bottle and a plastic bottle, leave them out for the same length of time, and then compare the taste (try to keep all other variables equal: lighting, heat, volume, etc.).
     
  4. Apr 12, 2009 #3

    JasonRox

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    I agree, unless he's keeping the bottle next to a heater or out in the hot sun.
     
  5. Apr 12, 2009 #4

    Evo

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    Odors tend to cling to plastic. There is/was a special dish soap that claimed to help remove odor from plastic.
     
  6. Apr 12, 2009 #5
    This is an observation over the last several years. I've eliminated everything I can think of. I even tried different kinds of plastic containers, old and new.

    If it's cold water, I don't taste it. But once I use room temp water, the plastic taste is immediately present in the plastic containers, but not the other materials.
     
  7. Apr 12, 2009 #6

    Evo

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  8. Apr 12, 2009 #7
    I'm not the only one with this complaint. ThriftyFun reports "Cyclists' water bottles often come with a pungent plastic taste/odor." Though I'm familiar with their solution; it did little for my mouth.

    WikiAnswers dismisses it as a visual psychological effect.

    Ah, here's a page that reports plastic leaching chemicals into water. http://trusted.md/blog/vreni_gurd/2007/03/29/plastic_water_bottles
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  9. Apr 12, 2009 #8

    turbo

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    Polycarbonate water bottles (hard plastic bottles) release BPA into the liquids stored in them. It has been recommended that hard plastic baby bottles be discarded and replaced with glass (or plastic bottles that are free of BPA). Google on BPA and plastic to see where this is going. BPA is known to have estrogen-like effects on mice at levels often less than those experienced by humans, though long-term human studies have not been conducted as far as I know. There is a study from last fall referenced in the linked article, but I haven't bothered digging up the paper.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26723119/
     
  10. Apr 12, 2009 #9

    Evo

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    Did you read my post about the chemicals causing plastic to smell?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  11. Apr 12, 2009 #10
    That was English? :grumpy:
     
  12. Apr 12, 2009 #11
    I can taste the difference between soda in a plastic bottle vs a metal can, so what you say sounds reasonable.
     
  13. Apr 12, 2009 #12

    russ_watters

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    Actually, cans are coated on the inside to prevent a metallic taste.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminum_can

    I'm not sure I exactly buy that explanation though, as most people report beer tasting better in glass bottles than in aluminum cans. I'm still inclined to believe leeching in beer cans.
     
  14. Apr 12, 2009 #13

    lisab

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    In a similar case, I definately can sense a plastic taste on bread that has been kept in a plastic bag for several hours (a sandwich bag). Whether it's a taste or a smell may be in question, but that seems irrelevant; it really makes bread yucky.
     
  15. Apr 12, 2009 #14
    The cans are coated with polycarbonate. The soda bottles most likely are some other plastic


    http://www.ourstolenfuture.org/NewScience/oncompounds/bisphenola/bpauses.htm

    There is a recycle code on the bottom of most bottles.

    http://www.thedailygreen.com/green-homes/latest/recycling-symbols-plastics-460321

    http://www.ides.com/resources/plastic-recycling-codes.asp
     
  16. Apr 13, 2009 #15

    Redbelly98

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    I used to taste the plastic in cycling bottles, after a couple of hours or so. I don't taste it in the clear plastic bottles beverages come in, the ones with the "1" in the triangle (polyethylene terephthalate or "PETE").
     
  17. Apr 13, 2009 #16
    Sometimes i can taste the water i drink plastic from.
     
  18. Apr 13, 2009 #17

    chemisttree

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    You are tasting something that is leaching from the plastic. It could be a plasticizer, UV stabilizer, lubricant, pyrolozates of all of these and/or the base polymer, and unreacted monomer(s). The fact that you taste it (in reality you smell it while you consume it) suggests that it is a volatile or semi volatile component. It is likely an additive. Phthalates are the most likely suspects.
     
  19. Apr 13, 2009 #18

    Moonbear

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    There are some brands of bottled water that I could taste the plastic in, so didn't buy them. It's been so long since I've needed to buy bottled water, though, that I don't remember which brands they were, and I don't know if they've corrected the problem since then.
     
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