I have always long sleeping hours? Why?

  • Thread starter Thermo
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In summary, people have different ideal hours of sleeping and if your sleep is not consistent with what is ideal then you may need to seek medical attention.
  • #1
Thermo
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For me, it's ideal to sleep 12 hours. Is it normal? I am like that since my teenage years. When it is less then 11-12 hours I always feel sleepy and it is hard to wake up. This affects my school and social life. Even I sleep earlier I need to get up late. Is there any ideal hours for general or every person has different ideal hours of sleeping? My problem is my routine or it's just what I am? Do I need to break the routine? Maybe? Thanks for the help...

Everybody talks about less sleeping problems or the things less sleeping causes. Now I think it's time to discuss this situation?
 
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  • #2
Thermo said:
... every person has different ideal hours of sleeping?
Yes.
 
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  • #3
Sleep requirements vary from person to person. See the National Sleep Foundation for a chart on what is ideal.

If you're falling outside of this, it's a good idea to seek medical advice. Conditions such as sleep apnea can interfere with your ability to get quality sleep. You want to make sure that there's no medical reason for abnormal sleeping first.

Beyond that there are other things you can do to improve the quality of your sleep:
  • Get a proper amount of exercise during the day. Avpid exercise immediately prior to sleeping.
  • Examine and adjust your diet. Foods with high fat content and lots of simple sugars can make you lethargic.
  • Caffeine is not a substitute for sleep. Reduce your intake and avoid it altogether from the late afternoon onwards.
  • As much as possible keep to a regular sleeping pattern. Go to bed at the same time every night.
  • Cut down on "mind racing" by writing out a list of things you need to get done the next day before you go to bed. That way you won't have to lie awake trying to remember them all.
  • Avoid screen time before bed. I don't recall the mechanism behind it, but staring at a bright computer or television before sleeping can interfere with your sleeping patterns. This can also help to avoid things that get you worked up or that are constantly fighting for your attention.
  • Consider your sleeping environment. Is anything waking you up during the night? Do you have a room mate who comes in drunk at three in the morning? Does your cell phone buzz or ring on your night stand whenever you get a text? Getting yourself in a calm, comfortable, non-disruptive environment can help to avoid stimuli that wake you.
  • Keep a dream or sleep journal. This can help you identify things that work or don't work.
 
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  • #4
Making sure your mattress/pillow is right for your body is important too. My grandma slept in a recliner for years and she slept for like a dozen hours as well and had poor energy. My parents bought her a new mattress and a special pillow for her to try. She now sleeps on the bed and only needs 6 hours while having great energy during the day.
 
  • #5
I have a private house I don't have any roommates. I had before and I totally hated it. That was one of the problems but not now and I was taking some meds(like depression meds). But those things do not exist anymore. I never wake up while sleeping like never... I sleep 12 hours generally without a blink and don't remember any dreams at all. Maybe the problem is computer and television but I can sleep well.
 
  • #6
Thermo said:
some meds(like depression meds)
If you are still taking medicine then these may also cause one to sleep more. Secondly are you the guy on right or left in your profile picture?
 
  • #7
Obviously I am the one on the left because it seems you couldn't understand that I am not taking meds anymore from my post.
 

Related to I have always long sleeping hours? Why?

1. Why do some people need more sleep than others?

There are several factors that can contribute to an individual's need for more sleep, such as genetics, age, health conditions, and lifestyle. Some people may have a genetic predisposition to requiring more sleep, while others may have underlying health issues that affect their sleep quality and quantity. Additionally, as we age, our sleep needs may change and we may require more rest. Lifestyle factors, such as stress, physical activity, and diet, can also impact our sleep patterns and how much rest we need.

2. Is it unhealthy to sleep for long periods of time?

Sleeping for long periods of time can be a sign of underlying health issues, such as sleep disorders, depression, or a thyroid problem. However, if there is no underlying health concern, it is not necessarily unhealthy to sleep for longer periods. Our bodies have individual sleep needs, and it is important to listen to our bodies and get the amount of rest that feels right for us.

3. Can oversleeping cause weight gain?

There is some evidence to suggest that oversleeping can contribute to weight gain. This is because oversleeping can disrupt our body's natural circadian rhythm, which can affect our metabolism and hunger hormones. Additionally, oversleeping may lead to a decrease in physical activity, which can also contribute to weight gain. However, it is important to note that oversleeping on its own is not a direct cause of weight gain and other factors, such as diet and exercise, also play a role.

4. How can I determine if I have a sleep disorder?

If you consistently find yourself needing more sleep than the average person, it may be worth speaking to a healthcare professional to determine if you have a sleep disorder. Some common signs of a sleep disorder include difficulty falling or staying asleep, excessive daytime sleepiness, and feeling unrested even after a full night's sleep. A medical evaluation and potentially a sleep study can help diagnose any potential sleep disorders.

5. Can changing my sleep habits help with having long sleeping hours?

Yes, making changes to your sleep habits can potentially help with having long sleeping hours. Some ways to improve your sleep habits include maintaining a consistent sleep schedule, creating a comfortable sleep environment, avoiding stimulating activities before bed, and managing stress levels. Additionally, addressing any underlying health issues or seeking treatment for a sleep disorder can also help improve sleep patterns and reduce the need for long sleeping hours.

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