I need a new OChem book...anything other than Klein's?

  • #1
ProfuselyQuarky
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Heyo. So my friend gave me their copy of Klein's 3rd edition a while ago for when I took ochem. It was loose-leaf and without a binder so they literally just shoved the loose pages in a tote bag lol. I guess that part is irrelevant but it was terrible.

Anyway, the text was pretty good but my profs always deviated from it, commenting that his example problems weren't complex enough (?) and that the material on synthesis could've been done better. I have since returned the book to said friend and now want to get a bound copy of an ochem book for casual practice and reference later on. Is there anything you can recommend? Or perhaps a supplement to Klein if I end up getting the same book.
 

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  • #2
jim mcnamara
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I can't give you a useful answer. Do you want sort of an encyclopedic guide to organic reactions? Or do you want the explanations, examples, and theory behind them? FWIW I use Pubchem and https://www.organic-chemistry.org/ for all the stuff I forgot, which being old, is a long list.
 
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  • #3
ProfuselyQuarky
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I can't give you a useful answer. Do you want sort of an encyclopedic guide to organic reactions? Or do you want the explanations, examples, and theory behind them? FWIW I use Pubchem and https://www.organic-chemistry.org/ for all the stuff I forgot, which being old, is a long list.
Haha I want a text with full explanations, mechanisms, examples, etc.

I appreciate the links! I'm not very good at e-books and websites for studying, but I'll definitely use them, thank you.
 
  • #4
TeethWhitener
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Well, something like March’s orgo book is certainly comprehensive, if a little advanced. I honestly don’t see an incredible amount of variety from intro orgo books. Though I’m always happy to recommend Corey’s Logic of Organic Synthesis and Nicolau’s Classics in Total Synthesis. The first was written by the creator of retrosynthetic analysis (he won his Nobel for it, among other things), the second is more aspirational: kind of a tour of some of the cleverest and most difficult synthetic feats ever accomplished.
 
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Organic Chemistry by Morrison and Boyd is one of the best explanatory book on introductory Organic Chemistry to Adavanced topics. I personally find that book very easy to read, to refer and to learn. Although, a large part of book is devoted to introductory topics but we do have some advanced topics also in there. Its focus is mainly on me mechanisms and (as I personally found) stereochemistry, i.e. structure.
 
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  • #6
ProfuselyQuarky
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Well, something like March’s orgo book is certainly comprehensive, if a little advanced. I honestly don’t see an incredible amount of variety from intro orgo books. Though I’m always happy to recommend Corey’s Logic of Organic Synthesis and Nicolau’s Classics in Total Synthesis. The first was written by the creator of retrosynthetic analysis (he won his Nobel for it, among other things), the second is more aspirational: kind of a tour of some of the cleverest and most difficult synthetic feats ever accomplished.
Thanks for this!! I really like the content of both March's book and Nicolau's series.
 

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