Identify Solutions in Beakers A, B & C

  • Thread starter SpecialKM
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In summary, to determine which solution is in each of the three beakers, we can first take a sample of each and add CaO to create a precipitate of CaSO4. Then, we can add Na2S to form a precipitate of Ag2S, which will help us identify the solution in the beaker. Additionally, there may be a simpler and more common reagent that can be used to detect silver. It is important to consider the use of additional reagents or the limitations of only using the three listed solutions in this process.
  • #1
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There are 3 beakers with solutions inside of the beakers A B and C, however the labels have fallen off!

The labels of the solutions are: MgSO4, CaCl2, and AgNO3.

Explain the steps you would use to determine which beaker has which solution inside of each of the three beakers.

_______________________

My first intuition is that you need to precipitate something, I just don't know what. :(
 
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  • #2
Follow your intuition then.

Are you allowed to use additional reagents, or can you use only the three listed? In the latter case I am not convinced all three solutions can be properly identified.
 
  • #3
We can do what ever we want with it! Well, what I think is that first we take a sample of each and add Ca 2+ ions (CaO) to each, and it should then create a precipitate of CaSO4. After that take additional samples from each and add sulphide ions (Na2S) to then form a precipitate of Ag2S.

That's what I think, is this correct?
 
  • #4
CaO as a source of Ca2+? Think it over.

Na2S will work, but silver can be detected much simpler, with much more common reagent.
 
  • #5


As a scientist, my approach would be to first observe the physical properties of each solution in the beakers. I would look at the color, clarity, and any visible particles or precipitates in the solutions. This initial observation can give some indication of what the solutions may be.

Next, I would use chemical tests to identify the ions present in each solution. For example, I could use a flame test to identify the presence of magnesium, calcium, or silver ions. I could also use reagents specific to each ion, such as adding sodium hydroxide to test for the presence of silver ions.

Another method would be to measure the pH of each solution. This can give an indication of the type of ion present, as different ions have different effects on pH.

If these initial tests do not provide a clear answer, I would then perform more specific tests based on the properties of each known solution. For example, I could add a carbonate solution to test for the presence of calcium ions, as calcium carbonate is insoluble and would form a precipitate.

Overall, the key is to use a combination of observation and specific tests to identify the solutions in each beaker. By carefully analyzing the physical and chemical properties, it is possible to determine which beaker contains which solution.
 

1. What are the different solutions in Beakers A, B, and C?

The solutions in Beaker A, B, and C are as follows: Beaker A contains a clear liquid, Beaker B contains a blue liquid, and Beaker C contains a yellow liquid.

2. How can we identify the solutions in Beakers A, B, and C?

We can identify the solutions in Beakers A, B, and C by conducting various tests such as pH testing, conductivity testing, and chemical reactions.

3. What is the purpose of identifying the solutions in Beakers A, B, and C?

Identifying the solutions in Beakers A, B, and C can help us determine the properties and characteristics of each solution, which can be useful in understanding their potential uses and effects.

4. Are there any safety precautions to take when identifying solutions in Beakers A, B, and C?

Yes, when handling and identifying solutions in Beakers A, B, and C, it is important to wear appropriate protective gear, such as gloves and goggles, to avoid any potential hazards.

5. Can we mix the solutions in Beakers A, B, and C together?

No, it is not recommended to mix the solutions in Beakers A, B, and C together as they may react and produce unknown or harmful substances. It is important to handle each solution separately and dispose of them properly according to safety guidelines.

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