If a coronal ejection like this happened during a total eclipse ...

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  • #2
.Scott
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Yes - even without the binoculars. And if they didn't observe it correctly, it could be the last thing they see.
Better to project it through a 1" hole in a cardboard light block with a lens covering the hole and then onto a white screen. Then watch the screen.

Also note that the video in that article is time-lapsed - many times faster than it actually appeared.
 
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  • #3
davenn
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would spectators be able to see it? How about with 12X binoculars?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/15/science/sun-solar-cycle.html
You are not likely to see much of it in visible light wavelengths
Prominences can sometimes be seen during total eclipses

from one of my eclipse photos, 4 small proms just visible

IMGP0761asm.jpg


The image you linked to is ionised helium, He II

Much/most of it is easily visible if you have a hydrogen alpha solar scope like my
LUNT LS60 THa. It has a very narrowband H-alpha filter in it < 1 Angstrom specifically
to observe prominences

IMG_1093sm.jpg


from that scope.....

1600748248974.png
 
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  • #4
davenn
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Yes - even without the binoculars.
with extreme difficulty, pretty near impossible
if it was easy without specialist scopes, everyone wouldnt be spending $1000's on the solar scopes
 
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  • #5
.Scott
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The brightest part of the prominence shown in the link is about 1/3 the solar diameter.
(The entire prominence is well more than that and extends beyond the frame).
 
  • #6
davenn
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The brightest part of the prominence shown in the link is about 1/3 the solar diameter.
(The entire prominence is well more than that and extends beyond the frame).

and .... ?

what is your point ? :smile:
 
  • #7
.Scott
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what is your point ? :smile:
Based on your post #3 above, some portion of a prominence can be visible.
So the issue is whether the size of the visible portion of the prominence in the video would be large enough to see during a total eclipse. There is a very meaty portion of that particular prominence that extends plenty far enough to be large enough to see.

How much of it would you expect is radiant in the visible spectrum?
 
  • #8
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You are not likely to see much of it in visible light wavelengths
Prominences can sometimes be seen during total eclipses

from one of my eclipse photos, 4 small proms just visible

View attachment 269868

The image you linked to is ionised helium, He II

Much/most of it is easily visible if you have a hydrogen alpha solar scope like my
LUNT LS60 THa. It has a very narrowband H-alpha filter in it < 1 Angstrom specifically
to observe prominences

View attachment 269867

from that scope.....

View attachment 269869
How much does a rig like yours cost these days?
 
  • #9
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I have the Coronado "Sol Ranger" -- has anyone used that? I got it a while ago. It's a nice scope but I haven't used it a lot. I remember going to Maine and there were some amateurs who let me look look through their scope. The Sun was amazing! Nice pics!
 
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  • #10
davenn
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I have the Coronado "Sol Ranger"
one of these ?

1600814639825.png


if so, that's just a finder scope to align the sun for viewing through the main scope, like this ....
The Coronado SolarMax 70 Telescope

1600814811598.png

Maybe you mis stated what you have ?


cheers
Dave
 
  • #11
davenn
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How much does a rig like yours cost these days?
The telescope with a B1200 blocking filter is AU$2500 (~ US$1800).
That tripod and mount (also used for several of my other scopes) is another ~ AU$1900 (~ US$1400)

Dave
 
  • #12
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one of these ?



if so, that's just a finder scope to align the sun for viewing through the main scope, like this ....
The Coronado SolarMax 70 Telescope


Maybe you mis stated what you have ?


cheers
Dave
Sorry Dave, yes that is the finder scope attached to the Coronado (I wasn't 100% sure if the whole kit was called that). I got the whole assembly from OPT many years ago because I wanted to be able to sun-gaze safely ! I looked on the body of the scope but I didn't see a reference to the model, but mine looks very similar to the pictures you posted.
 
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