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Courses If I struggled in chemistry, would I struggle in physics?

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Should I take high school physics when I struggled (but wasn't a total flop) in my chemistry class?

Hello,

I am a high school student in a rigorous high school environment, and I really needed some insight.
I took a chemistry course, and the little math stuff that was required in chemistry was the hardest for me. I also have fulfilled the credits I need for science, however, I still wanted to take physics in my junior year (while I take pre-calculus).

I think the different things physics talk about would be very interesting to learn, but I'm already taking three other rigorous classes.

Should I take physics in my junior year or maybe wait a bit?

Thank you so much for your opinions and time!
 

fresh_42

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To answer your question in the title first: This depends on why you struggled. E.g. laziness could be a reason to struggle everywhere. On the other hand are chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics three different fields with different skills required. Of course they are related and people who are good at one of them tend to be not complete idiots in the other. On the other hand, they are e.g. different in the amount of facts which have to be memorized.

I was pretty good in mathematics at school, but terribly failed in (organic) chemistry. I simply found no way to memorize all these carbon combinations, not to mention their properties. And although a very simple task, I really dislike the calculation of concentrations. I regularly confuse the total amount of the components with the total amount of the result, i.e. I simply don't know what is meant by a 5% solution: 100% + 5%, 95%+5%, 95.24%+4.76%, 95.25%.+4.75%. I have no clue and even less an idea how to memorize what the 5% refer to: before, after, componentwise, volume, weight, mass, molecules or whatever. So being bad at one doesn't necessarily mean being bad at another.

As to your second question: If you want to pursue a certain goal and it should happen, that you can't achieve it, then it's simple: the earlier you recognize it the better. But it has to be emphasized, that this does not mean, that there won't be obstacles and even less that they won't be possible to overcome. It means that normally the drop out rate in mathematics or natural sciences is highest at the end or within the first year, which in return means: if you'll make it through this year, your chances statistically will have improved. So it's probably better to find out early. Furthermore, physics can be a motivation to learn calculus and vice versa.
 

FactChecker

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It's hard to understand physics without the math prerequisites. I'm a little surprised that you would be allowed to take physics before you have completed pre-calculus. Maybe I have a misconception about what a high school physics class would be like.
 

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