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News In NYC, front doors are for rich people only

  1. Jul 22, 2014 #1

    Char. Limit

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    http://news.yahoo.com/nyc-front-doors-one-percent-120700147.html

    Apparently in New York City, people who dare commit the cardinal sin of making less than 50k a year are now relegated to going in their own homes through the alleyways. Sickening if you ask me, just sickening.
     
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  3. Jul 22, 2014 #2

    lisab

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    Wow, that's funny, in a really sick way!

    Long ago I had friends who lived in a gated community. After spending time there, I quickly realized the gates would not make me feel safer. Rather, they would make me feel penned in with a slice of society I do *not* want to spend much time with.
     
  4. Jul 22, 2014 #3
    But is it privately owned? Because as a patriotic American, anything that would get me frothing at the mouth, ranting about the government taking my freedoms is A-ok if you insert that one word. This just seems like the job creators giving more jobs to the door creators to me.
     
  5. Jul 22, 2014 #4
    Eh, if people don't like it they don't have to live there. It's a small price to pay IMO for living in a good neighboorhood and in what is probably a great building.

    ALSO - yahoo news is known for being innaccurate, senstional and having zero journalistic credibility - so this is probably not a widespread thing.
     
  6. Jul 22, 2014 #5
    And rather dangerous if you ask me.
     
  7. Jul 22, 2014 #6

    Char. Limit

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    Gotcha. Being treated as sub-human is a small price to pay.

    Also, I'm laughing at your dismissal of the source. But if you insist...

    Newsweek is acceptable, I take it?

    How about TIME?
     
  8. Jul 22, 2014 #7

    jbunniii

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    The article doesn't make clear whether the "poor door" restriction applies to all tenants earning below a threshold (which may include elderly people who bought generations ago, and who might well be better off than the new "rich" tenants if they own their units outright without a mortgage), or only those who are receiving government-subsidized housing. If the latter, I guess beggars can't be choosers.
     
  9. Jul 22, 2014 #8

    russ_watters

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    Sub-human? Are they real doors or doggie doors?
     
  10. Jul 22, 2014 #9

    Char. Limit

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    I might be exaggerating somewhat when I say that, but when you're told that you can't use the main door, you have to use a back door in an alley, it at the very least smacks of second-class citizenship. Or... residentship.
     
  11. Jul 22, 2014 #10

    jtbell

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    These are recently-built or about-to-be-built buildings. It looks like in effect, they're designed as two separate buildings abutting each other, with separate entrances and no shared common areas (lobbies, corridors, pools, exercise rooms, etc.)

    From the TIME reference given above (actually Money magazine):

     
  12. Jul 23, 2014 #11
    Yes, any source is better than yahoo, and those sources make it more clear that, like I said, this is a singular event - not a widespread trend.

    The above quote says it all really. A big part of the reason why people pay to live in those ridiculous buildings is because they want exclusivity - they want to feel part of an elite community, and don't want to let others in. Childish, irrational, petty? Sure, but the building managers are just giving their tenants what they're paying for.
     
  13. Jul 23, 2014 #12

    russ_watters

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    And at Disney World, you can pay extra to get your own special, shorter lines. Oh, the horror.
     
  14. Jul 23, 2014 #13

    Vanadium 50

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    Did anyonme see this quote: "West Side Rag also says the developer argues that, since the affordable units are in a separate part of the building, it legally must have its own entrance. "
     
  15. Jul 23, 2014 #14

    russ_watters

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    Also, if you look at the property on Google maps (40 Riverside blvd), it takes up an entire short block and doesn't have a "back alley".
     
  16. Jul 23, 2014 #15

    lisab

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    Hard to say, really - Google maps isn't reliable with addresses. And in most big cities the buildings run right up against each other. Where does one address end, and the other start? It's hard to tell.

    But you're right, there is no alley - that was hyperbole in the article. Alleys would take up too much valuable real estate in that part of town. There is a courtyard though, I bet that's where the secondary entrance is.

    And a "courtyard entry" actually sounds cool :cool:!

    I think I missed my calling.
     
  17. Jul 23, 2014 #16
    I remember one of my family members was making 50k a year, and my parents talked about her like if I stayed in school, I could one day make that much.
    Now, after finding out first hand about the cost of living in some cities, it seems like if you're not making 50k a year, you're living in squalor.

    I make 20k a year, work part time, go to school, have a car, my own place, go on about two trips a year, and I pay for everything myself. But, alas, I can't say I live in NYC, which is a huge part of living there, right?
     
  18. Jul 23, 2014 #17

    Matterwave

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    How can they possibly enforce the rule that "if you earn less than XXX you may not use this entrance"? What are they going to do, run a background check on you every time you enter the building to see if your new annual salary is high enough?

    It seems to me the only reasonable way is to designate which areas you are allowed in depending on which condo you bought. If you bought a cheap condo, you go to the cheap condo areas, if you bought an expensive condo you go to the expensive areas.

    In this case...how is this any worse than having a rich and a poor side of town or an expensive or cheap condo complex?
     
  19. Jul 23, 2014 #18

    lisab

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    I don't think they restrict doors by income. The units that are available to low-income people have income restrictions, and those units are not accessible through the front door. So if you're low income, you can come through the front door -- you just can't get to your home that way.

    I wonder what happens if you buy a low-income unit, and then get a raise?
     
  20. Jul 23, 2014 #19

    strangerep

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    Heh, I've even heard dark whispers about how some fat cats pay (a lot) extra for special airline seats, which are much more comfortable, have more room, and attract better cabin service, plus use of exclusive airport lounges, etc. :uhh:
     
  21. Jul 23, 2014 #20

    Matterwave

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    I don't get how this is bad then... you get what you pay for...?
     
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