Increase frequency of solar eclipses

  • I
  • Thread starter LightningInAJar
  • Start date
  • #1
LightningInAJar
213
30
TL;DR Summary
Hypothetically how can solar eclipses be increased?
I'm near Buffalo and our last total solar eclipse was in 1925 and it looks like the one tomorrow will also be cloudy. What could increase the frequency if we could play god? Decrease the moon's size and orbit, stabilize its wobble in its orbit, etc? Without affecting the gravity effects on earth is there anyway to increase the frequency in most cities to once every 25 years? I don't know if Buffalo gets another on this side of a millennium.
 
Astronomy news on Phys.org
  • #2
Once in a 100 years is ”lucky”. The world average is a total eclipse around once every four centuries.

If you move closer to the equator you may somewhat increase the rate as the ”risk” of an eclipse being annular would decrease (closer to the Moon).
 
  • Like
  • Informative
Likes russ_watters and FactChecker
  • #3
Move the Moon's orbit so it lies very nearly in the ecliptic plane. You get monthly eclipses, with totality wandering a little. It probably affects tides, but I don't think you get anything too severe.
 
  • Like
Likes collinsmark
  • #4
LightningInAJar said:
What could increase the frequency if we could play god?
Just a remark: sometime along the boom of low cost airlines there was a remarkable increase in the frequency of news about expected faraway eclipses.
So - no need to play god: you can just book a flight, as soon as the book for the date is open :wink:
 
  • #5
As often happens, the great Tom Weller has the answer,
1712577905782.png

(It's just as serious as this thread)
 
  • Haha
  • Like
Likes DaveE, jtbell and FactChecker
  • #6
Does anyone know the typical surface of totality during an eclipse? I want to figure how much that compares to earth's total surface area. According to the news a total solar eclipse happens every 18 months or so, but usually over the ocean. I want to figure the odds.
 
  • #7
LightningInAJar said:
Does anyone know the typical surface of totality during an eclipse? I want to figure how much that compares to earth's total surface area. According to the news a total solar eclipse happens every 18 months or so, but usually over the ocean. I want to figure the odds.
The odds are not that simple. They depend on things like latitude, time of day, etc.
 

Similar threads

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
15
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
3
Views
943
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
10
Views
11K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
17
Views
2K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
21
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
782
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy Media
Replies
25
Views
531
Back
Top