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Introversion/Extroversion's role in leadership ability

  1. Introversion/Extroversion plays a significant role in leadership ability

    2 vote(s)
    22.2%
  2. Introversion/Extroversion plays a moderate role in leadership ability

    3 vote(s)
    33.3%
  3. Introversion/Extroversion plays a nominal role in leadership ability

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Introversion/Extroversion plays no role in leadership ability

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. It depends on the employees

    5 vote(s)
    55.6%
  6. It depends on the project

    3 vote(s)
    33.3%
  7. It depends on the company

    2 vote(s)
    22.2%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Jul 8, 2012 #1

    Dembadon

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    Gold Member

    Here is an article I read in The Atlantic this morning:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/07/hire-introverts/9041/

    How do you feel about this article? Personally, I think it depends on the project and those being managed.

    Edit: I forgot to add that I believe Introversion/Extroversion plays a moderate role in leadership ability, with the caveats I've mentioned.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 8, 2012 #2
    When you take "too much initiative", it might require involvement of other teams etc. Your supervisor need to be supportive and proactive enough to help with dealing outside people. I believe "introvert people" might not be capable of supporting you. That being said I disagree with:
    That being said I don't believe too much in Introversion/Extroversion. I often see so many articles on the internet related to how introverts should be treated with the respect.

    P.S. On separate note, does introversion also refers to passiveness i.e. is the article trying to say passive leaders can be good also?
     
  4. Jul 8, 2012 #3
    From what I've read on the subject, which admittedly isn't much, what really matters for leadership is how good you are with people. What people tend to admire is a leader who is skilled with reconciling and avoiding conflict, but willing to stand up for what they believe in if they think it is important. If you don't have those qualities whether you are introverted or extroverted might not matter much.
     
  5. Jul 9, 2012 #4

    Dembadon

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    Gold Member

    Hi rootX, even though the article isn't very precise with its claims, it does seem to suggest that introverts are the more passive of the two. It claims such a style is effective when managing people who don't need constant inspiration.
     
  6. Jul 9, 2012 #5
    I'm in the middle of reading A Beautiful Mind. They're at the part where Nash worked for Rand. The Rand leader's policy was exactly what this article describes: hire good people then leave them alone. The layout of the offices and such was, however, designed to "maximize chance meetings" in the hallways.
     
  7. Jul 13, 2012 #6
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