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Is an electron a type of electromagnetic wave?

  1. Jan 2, 2009 #1
    In certain circumstances, when an electron collides with an anti-electron, the interaction produces two gamma photons.

    The reverse process would be a gamma photon colliding with a gamma photon, such that the interaction produces an electron and anti-electron.

    A gamma photon is a high energy electromagnetic transverse wave travelling at the speed-of-light.

    The electron and anti-electron produced have a wave nature also, but it is not as the electromagnetic transverse wave of the photon travelling at the speed-of-light. The electron and anti-electron also have angular momentum. (An anti-electron similar but with asymmetries such as angular momentum to maintain its conservation.)

    Is an electron be a form of electromagnetic wave that travels in some sort of rotational manner instead of the transverse manner that a photon travels in?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 2, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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    Correct although there is nothing special about an electron - it's just the lightest common elementary particle. Higher energy photons could make other particle pairs.

    Everything has a wave like nature. Golf balls have a wavelength which is why they are sometimes diffficult to localise.

    No, all particles with a momentum have wavelike properties - it is not unique to photons.
    This doesn't mean everything is a photon.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2009
  4. Jan 2, 2009 #3

    jtbell

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    So that's why I'm such a lousy putter! The ball diffracts around the hole! :eek:
     
  5. Jan 3, 2009 #4

    malawi_glenn

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    I guess so, I have the same problem
     
  6. Jan 3, 2009 #5

    dlgoff

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    Have you tried doing the 2 hole experiment?:biggrin:
     
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