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Other Is it worth it to go back and get a second degree in physics?

So, I already have a degree in (applied) mathematics. TBH, I don't know if twas the specific school I went to (I suspect it is, a lot of math students were miserable there), but I think I probably would have enjoyed physics more. I think I would jive very well with a mathematical physics program. I just don't know how worth it is, because it's hard to get a job in academia now, I didn't have an amazing undergrad gpa in math, and I don't want another bachelor's degree (BS, hah) experience.
Any advice? Thanks!
 

Vanadium 50

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Any advice?
Ask a clearer question? :oldwink:

You say you don't want another bachelor's degree experience but your title question asks if it is worth it? Haven't you answered your own question?
 
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Do you mean get a second B.S/ B.A in physics or apply to a graduate school to get a masters degree in physics Sometimes, a grad school will admit a candidate with a degree in a field strongly related to phusics
 

Joshy

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I hear good things about certificate programs too. It's something I've been considering because my GPA was also not too hot.

My friend got a physics degree and an alright GPA from the school we went to, but he struggled to achieve a job with it. I finished over 260 quarterly units of classes for my undergraduate degree; he took only 5 classes in the certificate program for about a year and a half, and we both became RF engineers.
 

CrysPhys

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I hear good things about certificate programs too. It's something I've been considering because my GPA was also not too hot.

My friend got a physics degree and an alright GPA from the school we went to, but he struggled to achieve a job with it. I finished over 260 quarterly units of classes for my undergraduate degree; he took only 5 classes in the certificate program for about a year and a half, and we both became RF engineers.
So you're saying that if you have a BS Physics and get a certificate in an engineering specialty, it can help you land a job in that engineering specialty. I'll accept that. But, the OP has a BS Applied Math. If he gets a certificate in mathematical physics (assuming some place offers such a thing), what job does that help him land (other than, perhaps, teaching high-school physics)?
 
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symbolipoint

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So, I already have a degree in (applied) mathematics. TBH, I don't know if twas the specific school I went to (I suspect it is, a lot of math students were miserable there), but I think I probably would have enjoyed physics more. I think I would jive very well with a mathematical physics program. I just don't know how worth it is, because it's hard to get a job in academia now, I didn't have an amazing undergrad gpa in math, and I don't want another bachelor's degree (BS, hah) experience.
Any advice? Thanks!
Your description asks for a vocational program but exactly what or which is not clear.
 

Joshy

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The OP also says their GPA isn't too great. I think the graduate school idea is a good one, but I'm also challenged by a low GPA and have considered a certificate program.... another stab at an undergraduate program could be a very large investment.

I certainly wouldn't suggest a certificate program as a "it solves all problems" sort of deal. My point was meant to address the less than amazing GPA concern; an aim for a career (nothing specific), and describe a scenario where it has shown success. Are there assumptions and limitations? Like most any other problems and answers: Yes. It's just another idea thrown into the hat and I think the concept has viability that is worth looking into. Is applied mathematics to physics really that big of a stretch? I don't know.
 

CrysPhys

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Is applied mathematics to physics really that big of a stretch? I don't know.
Not that big a stretch. But, my point is that in Post #4, you mentioned that you have a friend who got a BS Physics, couldn't find a job, got a certificate in engineering (your post really didn't say in what but I'm assuming it was in engineering), and subsequently got a job as an RF engineer. Now the OP has a BS Applied Math and wants to transition to a (presumably) career in physics. So if a BS Physics wasn't sufficient for your friend, why would a mere certificate in physics (if available) be sufficient for the OP?

In college, students often are not sure what they want to do. That's at least OK the first time around. But if they then end up unhappy with their jobs afterwards, and want to remedy their situations by returning to school, they should have a reasonable notion of what their target objectives are, and what the requirements for attaining those target objectives are. Is a certificate sufficient? Is a BS sufficient? Is a MS sufficient? Or is a PhD required? Depends on the target objective.
 
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StatGuy2000

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To the OP:

I have a few questions for you:

1. What are you currently doing now? You state that you completed your undergraduate degree in Applied Mathematics. Are you currently employed?

2. What do you wish to do ultimately? You say that you are interested in physics and that you don't want to pursue a second undergraduate degree. Do you want to go through with getting a PhD in physics?

3. You state that your GPA is not that high. What was your GPA from your Applied Math degree?

4. Related to #2 -- how many physics courses have you taken during your Applied Math BS program?
 

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