Is open science in Europe a double-edged sword?

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of open science in Europe and its potential impact on different fields of research. While some see it as a successful approach, others raise concerns about its application in applied sciences and public funded innovation. The discussion also touches upon the issue of funding for open access and how it can be addressed. Overall, there is a consensus that open access can bring about positive changes, but careful consideration is needed to address challenges and find effective solutions.
  • #1
ORF
170
18
Hello all,

in the near future, open science (open science != open access) will be real in Europe.

It is a bit controversial, specially in some fields. What do you think about it?

As far as I know, researchers in Astronomy exploit it successfully. But I am not sure about the impact of open science in applied sciences o public funded innovation

Regards,
orf
http://roadmap2018.esfri.eu
 
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  • #2
Could you expand upon what you feel are potential concerns in applied sciences?
Surely if anything is to be open access it should be something that is publicly funded (military matters aside). No?
I see no downside to open access, but rather the question of how best to adress funding. That's not a downside, that's a challenge. I expect members more knowledgeable on this point will discuss solutions.
 

Related to Is open science in Europe a double-edged sword?

1. What is open science?

Open science is a movement that promotes the free and open sharing of scientific knowledge, data, and tools. It aims to increase transparency, collaboration, and accessibility in the research process.

2. Why is open science important in Europe?

Open science is particularly important in Europe because it aligns with the European Commission's goal of creating a single European Research Area. It also promotes the principles of fairness, inclusivity, and excellence in research, which are crucial for advancing science and innovation in Europe.

3. What are the benefits of open science in Europe?

The benefits of open science in Europe include increased efficiency and reproducibility in research, improved access to scientific knowledge for all, and enhanced collaboration and interdisciplinary research. It can also lead to more impactful and relevant research outcomes.

4. What are some examples of open science initiatives in Europe?

There are many examples of open science initiatives in Europe, including the European Open Science Cloud, which provides a platform for sharing research data and tools; the OpenAIRE project, which promotes open access to research publications; and the FOSTER project, which offers training and resources for researchers on open science practices.

5. What challenges does open science face in Europe?

Some of the challenges facing open science in Europe include a lack of standardized policies and practices across countries, concerns about intellectual property and copyright, and the need for infrastructure and resources to support open science initiatives. There may also be cultural and institutional barriers that hinder the adoption of open science practices.

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