Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Is Ox or Redox more common in nature?

  1. Mar 13, 2010 #1
    Seems like a strange question, but it just appeared on one of my tests. My guess would be redox, but what is the logic behind the answer?

    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 14, 2010 #2

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I am not sure I understand what this question asks about. Oxes are relatively rare these days, as most young bulls end as a beef :biggrin: Then, oxes were never quite natural. Not to mention the fact I have no idea what ox can be further reduced to.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2013
  4. Mar 14, 2010 #3

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    What was the thought process behind your guess?
     
  5. Mar 14, 2010 #4
    Lol, no, I was talking about oxidation and reduction reactions, especially those relating to electrochemistry.

    I guessed redox because an element gains an electron, thus the electron loses energy. Oxidation on the other hand would require an input of energy to remove an electron. So I guessed that the one that didn't require an outside input of energy. Honestly though, It was a shot in the dark. We get a lot of these on our tests, really just guessing using what you learned doing other things.
     
  6. Mar 14, 2010 #5

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Redox is not an opposition to oxidation, redox is a collective word for both reduction and oxidation processes.

    Give an example of oxidation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2013
  7. Mar 14, 2010 #6
    Red-Half - Ag+(aq) + 1e --> Ag(s)
    Ox-Half - Cu(s) --> Cu+2(aq) + 2e

    Overall Rxn: 2Ag+(aq) + Cu(s) --> 2Ag(s) + Cu2+(aq)

    This is in relation to voltaic cells though. Ag being the cathode, and Cu being the anode.
     
  8. Mar 14, 2010 #7

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Very good.

    But you have shown two processes - red and ox. Is it possible for only one to occur?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2013
  9. Mar 14, 2010 #8
    Haha, your too good at this. They occur in equal measure, because for one to take place your must have the other.
     
  10. Mar 14, 2010 #9

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Bingo.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2013
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook