Is superimposing three velocities possible?

  • Thread starter Nitric
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In summary, the conversation is about the possibility of superposing Lorentz transformations that are greater than c/3. The participants discuss a scenario involving objects moving at different velocities and how it affects their perception of each other's speed. It is concluded that superposition is not possible in this situation.
  • #1
Nitric
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each of which is greater than c/3? can it work?

edit: i mean superposing* in the title
 
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  • #2
Nitric said:
each of which is greater than c/3? can it work?

edit: i mean superposing* in the title
I assume you are referring to the Lorentz transformations. Perhaps if you specified the situation you are thinking of we could be of more help.
 
  • #3
Nitric said:
each of which is greater than c/3? can it work?

Nope … if A thinks B is going north at c/2, and B thinks C is going north at c/2, and C thinks D is going north at c/2, then A still thinks D is going less than c (how much? :wink:)
 

Related to Is superimposing three velocities possible?

1. Is it possible to superimpose three velocities?

Yes, it is possible to superimpose three velocities. Superimposition is the process of combining multiple velocities to create a resultant velocity. In physics, velocities are vectors, which means they have both magnitude and direction. By using vector addition, we can calculate the resultant velocity when three velocities are superimposed.

2. How do you superimpose three velocities?

To superimpose three velocities, we use the principle of vector addition. This involves breaking down each velocity into its horizontal and vertical components and then adding the corresponding components together. The resultant horizontal and vertical components are then combined to calculate the resultant velocity. This process can be visualized using vector diagrams.

3. Can you superimpose velocities in any direction?

Yes, you can superimpose velocities in any direction. Velocities are vectors and can have any direction in three-dimensional space. As long as you have the magnitude and direction of each velocity, you can use vector addition to calculate the resultant velocity, regardless of the direction.

4. What happens when you superimpose velocities in the same direction?

When you superimpose velocities in the same direction, the resultant velocity will have a magnitude that is equal to the sum of the individual velocities. This is because the individual velocities are adding together, resulting in a larger magnitude. The direction of the resultant velocity will be the same as the direction of the individual velocities.

5. Is it possible to superimpose velocities in opposite directions?

Yes, it is possible to superimpose velocities in opposite directions. When velocities are in opposite directions, they will have different signs for their magnitudes (one will be positive and one will be negative). When added together, the resultant velocity will have a smaller magnitude than the individual velocities. The direction of the resultant velocity will depend on the magnitudes and directions of the individual velocities.

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