Is the formation of galaxy groups explained correctly here?

In summary, the conversation discusses the formation of galaxy groups and how quantum fluctuations played a role in this process. The video explains that after the initial inflation period following the big bang, gravity started to hold matter together and form galaxy groups. The explanation is deemed correct, but the individual asking the questions suggests a simpler explanation involving uneven distribution of matter during inflation. Quantum fluctuations are then discussed as a contributing factor to the distribution of matter in the early universe.
  • #1
PrincePhoenix
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Hello!

I watched a video on the Youtube channel Kurzgesagt titled How far can we go? Limits of humanity
The video attempts to explain why we may be limited to our local galaxy group even with science fiction technologies.

During a part of the video (starting at 2:26), they try to explain how galaxy groups formed by saying that after the initial inflation period following big bang, gravity started to take hold. While it was too weak to get everything back together, in some pockets of space with more "denser" in terms of "energy" (quantum fluctuations before inflation) gravity was able to hold matter together and this formed groups/clusters of galaxies, within which matter is gravitationally linked. (If you think I might not phrasing it correctly and have time, I will appreciate it if you watch this section of the video directly)

Is this explanation correct? Wouldn't a simpler explanation be that matter was unevenly distributed during inflation and only those areas with high densities came together to form galaxy groups?
How do quantum fluctuations contribute to gravity? (My understanding of quantum fluctuations isn't much more than that explained in the video)

Thanks in advance. :)
 
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  • #2
PrincePhoenix said:
Is this explanation correct? Wouldn't a simpler explanation be that matter was unevenly distributed during inflation and only those areas with high densities came together to form galaxy groups?

The explanation is pretty much correct. As for "simpler", your explanation may be simpler, but it requires that someone already know a bit about how gravity works.

PrincePhoenix said:
How do quantum fluctuations contribute to gravity? (My understanding of quantum fluctuations isn't much more than that explained in the video)

Quantum fluctuations lead to slightly different densities in different regions of the very early universe. The regions that were more dense are the ones that collapsed to form galaxies. The regions that were less dense tended to become voids.
 
  • #3
Drakkith said:
The explanation is pretty much correct. As for "simpler", your explanation may be simpler, but it requires that someone already know a bit about how gravity works.
Quantum fluctuations lead to slightly different densities in different regions of the very early universe. The regions that were more dense are the ones that collapsed to form galaxies. The regions that were less dense tended to become voids.

Thank you for the answer. :smile:

Can you please explain how quantum fluctuations affected the distribution of matter? (I assume you were referring to the distribution of mass in space with your use of the phrase "...different densities in different regions...")
 
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  • #4
PrincePhoenix said:
Can you please explain how quantum fluctuations affected the distribution of matter? (I assume you were referring to the distribution of mass in space with your use of the phrase "...different densities in different regions...")

The quantum fluctuations are variations in the position of matter and radiation in space via quantum effects (uncertainty principle, etc). This naturally leads to areas with higher or lower than average densities.
 
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  • #6
Drakkith said:
The quantum fluctuations are variations in the position of matter and radiation in space via quantum effects (uncertainty principle, etc). This naturally leads to areas with higher or lower than average densities.

Thank you for the explanation.
 

1. What is the formation of galaxy groups?

The formation of galaxy groups refers to the process by which individual galaxies come together to form larger structures known as galaxy groups. This occurs through the gravitational attraction between galaxies in a particular region of space.

2. How are galaxy groups formed?

Galaxy groups are formed through a combination of hierarchical clustering and mergers between individual galaxies. Hierarchical clustering refers to the gradual accumulation of smaller groups into larger ones, while mergers occur when two or more galaxies collide and merge together due to their gravitational forces.

3. What factors influence the formation of galaxy groups?

The formation of galaxy groups is influenced by various factors, including the distribution of dark matter, the initial conditions of the universe, and the presence of other large structures such as galaxy clusters. The specific formation process can also be affected by the dynamics and interactions between individual galaxies within the group.

4. How is the formation of galaxy groups explained?

The formation of galaxy groups is explained by current theories of cosmology and astrophysics, which take into account the physical laws and processes that govern the behavior of matter and energy in the universe. These theories, such as the hierarchical model of structure formation, provide a framework for understanding how galaxy groups form and evolve over time.

5. Are there any unresolved questions about the formation of galaxy groups?

While our understanding of the formation of galaxy groups has improved significantly in recent years, there are still some unresolved questions and areas of ongoing research. These include the role of dark matter in galaxy group formation, the effects of galaxy mergers on group dynamics, and the relationship between galaxy groups and larger structures such as galaxy clusters and superclusters.

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