Is the measurement of "IQ" outdated, and needs replacement?

  • #1
Upon reading about what members of this forum think about "IQ" (they don't think highly of it if you're wondering), and the rather inherent discrimination that measuring IQ comparatively to other individuals/nations/races/genders have/has, is there any attempt in the field of psychology, or otherwise, to devise a better measure of predictive power on educational/social/financial success rather than a monolithic and rather outdated concept of "IQ"?
 

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  • #3
russ_watters
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Upon reading about what members of this forum think about "IQ" (they don't think highly of it if you're wondering), and the rather inherent discrimination that measuring IQ comparatively to other individuals/nations/races/genders have/has, is there any attempt in the field of psychology, or otherwise, to devise a better measure of predictive power on educational/social/financial success rather than a monolithic and rather outdated concept of "IQ"?
For what purpose?
 
  • #4
For what purpose?

Well, many parents hold the belief that having a child with a high IQ is predictive of their future academic performance. So, then how do you deal with a kid with average or sub-average IQ? There really isn't much that can be done to alter one's IQ after the age of 10.

Instead, it would be of much more utility to focus on traits that lead to academic or financial success, such as delayed gratification, fostering interest in a field of study, conscientiousness, a hard work ethic and so on.
 
  • #5
russ_watters
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Well, many parents hold the belief that having a child with a high IQ is predictive of their future academic performance. So, then how do you deal with a kid with average or sub-average IQ? There really isn't much that can be done to alter one's IQ after the age of 10.
Well that's very on-point. See this for an example:
Parents may request an evaluation to determine if their child is exceptional and in need of special services by contacting their child’s guidance counselor. Gifted students who have an IQ score of 130 or higher and demonstrate, through multiple criteria, that they are eligible for and in need of special programming. An IQ of at least 130 is obtained by only the highest 2-3% students on measures of intellectual ability. Students with IQ scores in the Superior range (120 to 129) may be eligible for Gifted Support if they demonstrate superiority in academic achievement and ratings by parents and teachers.
http://www.npenn.org/Page/15710

That's my school district and I was so identified, in elementary school. But my grades never reflected my "superior"/"exceptional" label. But to answer your question: except with regard to using it as a tool when you are required to use it as a tool, it isn't really something you need to deal with directly. A parents' approach to guiding their kids has to start long before they take the IQ test and be based on their kids' particular demonstrated abilities/deficiencies and the later taking/results of the IQ test don't change that.
Instead, it would be of much more utility to focus on traits that lead to academic or financial success, such as delayed gratification, fostering interest in a field of study, conscientiousness, a hard work ethic and so on.
That's true, but previously you were asking about a measurement. And my point regarding this specific example is that outcomes are in this case self-contained measurements. If the outcome you are looking for is good grades, then the measure/predictor of good grades is good grades. No proxy required.
 
  • #7
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Actually you can improve your IQ, there have been many books written on the subject. Have you ever heard that watching tv lowers you IQ? While this may not be a positive change, it is still a change. However I do agree that focusing on beneficial skills may be a more productive and successful endeavor. I try to work on both.
 
  • #8
Evo
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Upon reading about what members of this forum think about "IQ" (they don't think highly of it if you're wondering), and the rather inherent discrimination that measuring IQ comparatively to other individuals/nations/races/genders have/has, is there any attempt in the field of psychology, or otherwise, to devise a better measure of predictive power on educational/social/financial success rather than a monolithic and rather outdated concept of "IQ"?
IQ tests were developed to identify children with learning disabilities. Russ gave another example of how they are being used by schools.

And yet another IQ thread is closed.
 

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