Is the system in translational equilibrium?

In summary, the conversation discusses a conceptual misunderstanding about a mechanic turning a wrench and whether the system is in translational equilibrium. It is determined that the center of mass of the wrench does not remain stationary and the system is free to move and display translational motion. The conversation also addresses the possibility of a reaction force at the nut in relation to the system's ability to move.
  • #1
Oerg
352
0
Ok, I need to clear a little conceptual misunderstanding and I hope some of you will be kind enough to help me.

Consider a mechanic turning a wrench about a nut. He exerts a force that is perpendicular to the wrench.

Is the system in translational equilibrium? Is there a reaction force at the nut such that it will give a net resultant force of zero ?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
any help? :confused::cry:
 
  • #3
is there something wrong with my question :sigh: last and final bump
 
  • #4
I too have two questions :-)

Whether the center of mass of the wrench remains stationary?

Whether the system with the nut is free to move and still remains in equilibrium?
 
  • #5
ok,

centre of mass of wrench does not remain stationary

System is free to move and to display translational motion.

Oh, I get it, if the system is not free to move, that means that there will be a reaction force at the nut correct??
 

Related to Is the system in translational equilibrium?

What is translational equilibrium?

Translational equilibrium refers to a state in which the net force acting on an object is zero and the object is either at rest or moving with a constant velocity.

How can we determine if a system is in translational equilibrium?

To determine if a system is in translational equilibrium, we need to analyze the forces acting on the system. If the sum of all forces in the system is zero, then the system is in translational equilibrium.

What happens if a system is not in translational equilibrium?

If a system is not in translational equilibrium, it means that there is a net force acting on the system and the object will either accelerate or decelerate depending on the direction of the net force.

What are some real-life examples of translational equilibrium?

Some examples of translational equilibrium in everyday life are a book resting on a table, a car moving at a constant speed on a straight road, and a person standing still on the ground.

How is translational equilibrium different from rotational equilibrium?

Translational equilibrium deals with the forces acting on an object as a whole, while rotational equilibrium involves the forces acting on an object that is rotating around a fixed axis. In translational equilibrium, the net force is zero, while in rotational equilibrium, the net torque is zero.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
687
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
31
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
280
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
562
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
242
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
Back
Top