Is there more than one meaning of the notation f(x)=[x] ?

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Is there more than one meaning of the notation "f(x)=[x]"?

In my real analysis text book there is a question that says:

Decide whether [tex]f(x)=[x][/tex] is bounded above or below on the interval [tex][0,a][/tex] where [tex]a[/tex] is arbitrary, and whether the function takes on it's maximum or minimum value within that same interval.

This question is very straightforward, assuming [tex][x]=x[/tex]. But if that is the case, then the choice of notation is very strange.

Is there another way to interpret the notation's meaning?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
pwsnafu
Science Advisor
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Usually, that's the "integer part" function. Eg f(3.12) = 3
 
  • #3
HallsofIvy
Science Advisor
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Strictly speaking
[tex]\lfloor x\rfloor[/tex]
which looks like [x] with missing upper serifs is the "integer part" of x (the largest integer less than or equal to x). If your text has all of the [ ] parts, I recommend you look through your text book (perhaps there is an "index of symbols") or ask your teacher for the meaning of that symbol.
 
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