Is this a solution for congestion impacting emergency response?

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In summary, the idea is to have pedestrian volunteers bide in areas of dense traffic to help emergency vehicles get through. These volunteers would need to be paired or in good proximity to other volunteers to reach various points quickly. If gridlock is caused by too much traffic, the volunteers could form a physical barrier to prevent traffic from entering the intersections.
  • #1
BrassOctopus
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Consider this situation:


I'm sure every one of us would dread being in that ambulance. So I am looking for input on this idea to assist emergency vehicles.

Suppose that the city put out a call for pedestrian volunteers to bide in segments of the city where such congestion creates these hold-ups. Give them some pretty badges and vests so they have some degree of official-looking importance. They would basically need to be paired or in good proximity to other volunteers to reach various points with celerity. I can see them on bicycles, scooters, or segways. Using a smartphone app, when emergency crews need a route cleared, the app could send requests to those volunteers to go to intersections like this, and then using a bright cord or tape, cordon off a street until the response vehicle gets through. It looks like they would only need to cordon off but one part of a single street. I'm sure the app could be set up so a driver can simply draw the route he/she needs.

I don't think this is an issue for the entire city, just areas like this where traffic and pedestrians are dense. What are your thoughts?

ADD:
I know a lot of pedestrians will just lift the cord up and disregard it, but I think most will respect it and passive persistence might condition the public over time when a physical barrier is right in front of them. It will certainly stop most of the vehicles.
 
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  • #2
BrassOctopus said:
Consider this situation:


I'm sure every one of us would dread being in that ambulance. So I am looking for input on this idea to assist emergency vehicles.

Suppose that the city put out a call for pedestrian volunteers to bide in segments of the city where such congestion creates these hold-ups. Give them some pretty badges and vests so they have some degree of official-looking importance. They would basically need to be paired or in good proximity to other volunteers to reach various points with celerity. I can see them on bicycles, scooters, or segways. Using a smartphone app, when emergency crews need a route cleared, the app could send requests to those volunteers to go to intersections like this, and then using a bright cord or tape, cordon off a street until the response vehicle gets through. It looks like they would only need to cordon off but one part of a single street. I'm sure the app could be set up so a driver can simply draw the route he/she needs.

I don't think this is an issue for the entire city, just areas like this where traffic and pedestrians are dense. What are your thoughts?

ADD:
I know a lot of pedestrians will just lift the cord up and disregard it, but I think most will respect it and passive persistence might condition the public over time when a physical barrier is right in front of them. It will certainly stop most of the vehicles.

The problem there was the gridlock. Even with controlled intersections, you still have gridlock in the way, so there's probably not much that can be done other than using a drone ambulance.

In non-gridlock situations in many other cities, we use intersection control to clear intersections ahead of the emergency vehicle (EMS, Fire, etc.). Orthogonal streets get a long red light and the direction you are traveling has continuous green. That let's drivers in your direction of travel have the ability to move to the side of the road since they are free-flowing.
 
  • #3
Wikipedia:
Traditional gridlock is caused by cars entering an intersection on a green light without enough room on the other side of the intersection at the time of entering to go all the way through. This can lead to the car being trapped in the intersection when the light turns green in the other direction. If the same situation occurs simultaneously in multiple intersections, these cars can be trapped in the intersections indefinitely.

In many jurisdictions, drivers are therefore prohibited from entering an intersection at a green light if there is no room for them to clear the intersection. If all drivers follow this rule, gridlock is impossible.
I'm thinking that the volunteers would form the physical barrier to prevent traffic from entering those intersections, which could be planned via the phone app.
 
  • #4
You don't need volunteers if you have coordinated traffic lights. And the gridlock that I saw in that video was from too much traffic in that area. Even with the green light, only a couple cars could move per green light cycle.

Picking up the Patient in a Firefighter carry and humping them to the ED would probably have been quicker in that situation... You can get to the Patient faster on a bike or motorcycle, but you can't really transport them once you reach them. Honestly, the drone ambulance looks like the only improvement in that kind of situation, IMO.
 
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  • #5
BrassOctopus said:
Give them some pretty badges and vests so they have some degree of official-looking importance.
Like crossing guards, or the police?
 
  • #6
256bits said:
Like crossing guards, or the police?
Crossing guards is close.
 
  • #7
https://www.pyongyangtrafficgirls.com/

kud_2110.jpg


The glorious leader has considered this problem.
 
  • #8

Related to Is this a solution for congestion impacting emergency response?

1. What is congestion and how does it impact emergency response?

Congestion refers to the buildup of vehicles or other traffic on a road or in a specific area. This can cause delays and slower travel times for emergency response vehicles such as ambulances and fire trucks. In severe cases, it can even prevent these vehicles from reaching their destination in a timely manner, potentially impacting the outcome of emergency situations.

2. What are some possible solutions for congestion impacting emergency response?

Some possible solutions for congestion impacting emergency response include implementing traffic management systems, creating designated emergency vehicle lanes, and using GPS technology to optimize routes for emergency vehicles. Additionally, increasing public awareness and education about the importance of clearing the way for emergency vehicles can also help alleviate congestion.

3. Are there any downsides to implementing solutions for congestion impacting emergency response?

While solutions for congestion impacting emergency response can greatly improve response times, there may be some downsides to consider. These could include increased costs for implementing and maintaining new systems, potential resistance from drivers to change their behavior, and the need for ongoing evaluation and adjustment to ensure effectiveness.

4. How can data be used to inform solutions for congestion impacting emergency response?

Data can be a valuable tool in identifying areas of high congestion and analyzing patterns and trends in traffic flow. This information can then be used to inform the development and implementation of targeted solutions, as well as to monitor and measure their effectiveness over time.

5. What role can individuals and communities play in addressing congestion impacting emergency response?

Individuals and communities can play a crucial role in addressing congestion impacting emergency response by following traffic laws and regulations, keeping emergency vehicle lanes clear, and being aware of their surroundings while driving. Additionally, community leaders can advocate for and support the implementation of solutions, and individuals can actively engage in initiatives to improve traffic flow in their area.

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