Keeping a foot in the engineering world.

  • Engineering
  • Thread starter BradP
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Engineering
In summary, the author graduated three years ago with a B.S. in mechanical engineering. They then worked for a start up company that did energy analysis for buildings. However, they left the company because there were not many opportunities and they are now working as a math and physics tutor. They enjoy tutoring, but they are uncertain about their future if they pursue engineering and are concerned about the economy. They are also interested in pursuing non-degree classes alongside, but they do not know what they are interested in.
  • #1
BradP
38
0
I graduated three years ago with a B.S. in mechanical engineering. Then I worked for a start up company that did energy analysis for buildings. However I was doing mostly administrative work because the company had to do a lot of things to grow, and there just weren't that many opportunities. I chose to leave eventually, and am now working for a company as a math and physics tutor.

I enjoy tutoring, but there is not a whole lot of variety. I imagine it might get old after a while. But my main concern is that if I do just do this for a couple years, will I still be able to get a position as an engineer? I don't really know what kind of job I want exactly. I wanted to do energy analysis/auditing at first, but as I've tried to study it, it seems like gaining proficiency is an endless process of absorbing more details rather than putting any fundamental engineering skills or principles into practice.

That means if I do get an engineering position, it will probably be absolute entry-level in some other type of work. How would it look if I have just been tutoring physics and calculus at high school or introductory college level?

I just got my E.I.T. recently. Is there anything else I can do to sort of keep a foot in the door?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I was going to suggest the EIT :smile:.

I'm thinking that yes, it may have a deleterious effect on being hired, if you haven't done engineering in a while. You could take a few classes, maybe...or even get a master's.

Just curious: why are you planning to keep tutoring for a couple years? Is it because the economy is bad?
 
  • #3
Hi, I don't know, I can think of a lot of reasons why I sort of want to do this for a while. First, I feel like it is intellectually stimulating. It is great review for a lot of topics, and it is a challenge to explain some things, even if I know how to solve them. I can add subjects if I master others. I like the self-reliant nature of the work.

The economy is a factor too. I've been job searching for a while and I just sort of want to focus on my work without constantly thinking about my career. I am also afraid I will not like a job I get. I have been skipping around companies with internships, the start-up company, and freelancing, and I feel like my next position should really be something stable, or else my resume will look terrible. So I thought maybe just make this a stable position.

But I am not even 100% sure I can support myself with it. I have been increasing hours but am still not at a full-time income. But, that is my own issue. What I am really interested in is what I could do afterward if I do pursue it, because I doubt I'll do it for like 30 years.

I could try to take non-degree classes alongside, but I don't know what I am definitely interested in, and it might be more difficult financially. Are there any good grad-level courses for someone who is basically undecided on a program?
 

Related to Keeping a foot in the engineering world.

What is the importance of keeping a foot in the engineering world?

Keeping a foot in the engineering world is important because it allows scientists to stay updated with current trends and advancements in technology. It also provides opportunities for collaboration and networking with other engineers, which can lead to new ideas and innovations.

How can scientists balance their research with their involvement in the engineering world?

Scientists can balance their research with their involvement in the engineering world by managing their time effectively and prioritizing their responsibilities. They can also delegate tasks and collaborate with other researchers to ensure that their involvement in the engineering world does not compromise the quality of their research.

What are some ways scientists can stay connected to the engineering world?

Scientists can stay connected to the engineering world by attending conferences, workshops, and seminars related to their field of research. They can also join professional organizations and participate in online communities to network and stay updated on the latest developments in engineering.

How can being involved in the engineering world benefit a scientist's career?

Being involved in the engineering world can benefit a scientist's career in various ways. It can open up opportunities for collaboration, funding, and career advancement. It can also enhance their knowledge and skills, making them more competitive in their field.

What are some challenges scientists may face in keeping a foot in the engineering world?

Some challenges scientists may face in keeping a foot in the engineering world include time management, balancing responsibilities, and staying updated with rapidly evolving technologies. They may also face challenges in finding funding and resources for projects that bridge the gap between science and engineering.

Similar threads

  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
21
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
27
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
2
Replies
39
Views
4K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
10
Views
988
Back
Top