Knot(s) to tie end of fishing line under tension

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In summary: Hi. I need to tie some nylon monofilament fishing line so that it's under tension.I can tie one end to a support, e.g. using a "uni-knot". Then the line will need to be stretched and the other end will need to be wrapped around/tied to another support a few metres away.Nylon fishing line is springy and smooth; this will make it difficult to tie while simultaneously being held taut.Does anyone know of any suitable knots (or have any other suggestions)?In summary, nylon fishing line is difficult to tie while under tension, but using a knot or a "trucker's hitch" might work. If I
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Steve4Physics
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TL;DR Summary
I need to tie a few metres of fishing line so it is taut. I can tie one end while the line is slack. But then tying the other end, while keeping line taut, will be tricky. Any special knots which will do the job?
Hi. I need to tie some nylon monofilament fishing line so that it’s under tension. (Only moderate tension is needed – pulling by hand to make the line taut is sufficient.)

I can tie one end to a support, e.g. using a using a ‘uni-knot’. Then the line will need to be stretched and the other end will need to be wrapped around/tied to another support a few metres away.

Nylon fishing line is springy and smooth; this will make it difficult to tie while simultaneously being held taut.

Does anyone know of any suitable knots (or have any other suggestions)?

(FWIW, this is for a bird deterrent system my neighbour has asked me to put on her garage roof. The birds are fond of perching on the edge of the roof and performing their toilet-functions. She thinks some nylon lines won't be too noticeable and may be sufficient to stop the birds perching there.)
 
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  • #2
What if you hung small weights on the lines? Would that provide sufficient tension?

That might actually be a better way of doing it than knots, since it's easy, it's fine-tunable and it's reversible.
 
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  • #3
But to your ask: what you are looking for is called a taut-line hitch* or a tension knot. It can be adjusted as-needed, but will bind under load. I used this on my boat to make rope hand-holds. I am not sure how well it will work with fishing line.

*I'll let you find your preferred instruction source
 
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  • #4
I like the weighted line idea.
It will also take care of any length variance due to changes in the weather conditions (heat and moisture). Nylon can absorb water and would probably change size to some degree.
 
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DaveC426913 said:
What if you hung small weights on the lines? Would that provide sufficient tension?

That might actually be a better way of doing it than knots, since it's easy, it's fine-tunable and it's reversible.
Thanks. Good lateral thinking! Not sure of the visual impact - it could work if done subtly. I'll add it to the option list.
 
  • #6
DaveC426913 said:
But to your ask: what you are looking for is called a taut-line hitch* or a tension knot. It can be adjusted as-needed, but will bind under load. I used this on my boat to make rope hand-holds. I am not sure how well it will work with fishing line.

*I'll let you find your preferred instruction source
Thanks. Interesting. I think I'll need to experiment to see how well it works with nylon fishing line.
 
  • #7
BillTre said:
I like the weighted line idea.
It will also take care of any length variance due to changes in the weather conditions (heat and moisture). Nylon can absorb water and would probably change size to some degree.
Thanks. I didn't know about the water absorption. And length-changes could be a nuisance.

But you and @DaveC426913 have given me an idea! If I can get my hands on a (not-too-expensive) suitable stainless steel spring, the spring could be at one end of the line to maintain the tension. With a bit of planning it should be possible to use the spring to make assembly easy as well as make the system stable. I'll investigate.
 
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  • #8
Steve4Physics said:
I need to tie some nylon monofilament fishing line so that it’s under tension.
The "Trucker's Hitch" knot might work for this. I use it all the time with rope to tie loads on top of my Jeep. Maybe give it a try to see if it works with monofilament in your application:



Kayak on Jeep Right.jpg
 
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  • #9
berkeman said:
The "Trucker's Hitch" knot might work for this. I use it all the time with rope to tie loads on top of my Jeep. Maybe give it a try to see if it works with monofilament in your application:



View attachment 327090

But woe betide you if neglect the final incantation of slapping the roof twice and uttering "That's not going anywhere!"
 
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  • #10
Arrrr, matie! :wink:
 
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  • #11
Steve4Physics said:
TL;DR Summary: I need to tie a few metres of fishing line so it is taut. I can tie one end while the line is slack. But then tying the other end, while keeping line taut, will be tricky. Any special knots which will do the job?

Does anyone know of any suitable knots (or have any other suggestions)?
one possibility could be to clamp the two ends of the line and take tension off the two free ends. Any fishing knot would work and you could tie it at your leisure. If you are vaguely DIY inclined, it would be straightforward to pre-tension the lines onto a rod with a couple of Jubilee clips. Nylon stretches easily if the total length is several metres.
 
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  • #12
Steve4Physics said:
(FWIW, this is for a bird deterrent system my neighbour has asked me to put on her garage roof. The birds are fond of perching on the edge of the roof and performing their toilet-functions. She thinks some nylon lines won't be too noticeable and may be sufficient to stop the birds perching there.)
sophiecentaur said:
Nylon stretches easily if the total length is several metres.
Good point. @Steve4Physics -- could you use a different material that is still stealthy but does not stretch? Something like thin white string, or thin white hookup wire?
 
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  • #13
Why not make loops on the ends of the lines and hook them over when you've joined the bits?
Alternatively, you can get hold of very wide mesh net which won't hurt or catch the birds but they won't stay there for long.

Also, you can get plastic spikes which they won't want to land on.
 
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  • #14
berkeman said:
Good point. @Steve4Physics -- could you use a different material that is still stealthy but does not stretch? Something like thin white string, or thin white hookup wire?
It's possible. But my neighbour has already bought a reel of nylon line and presented me with it! So that's my preferred choice at presernt. I'll probably use with the nylon line and see how it goes. Swapping it with another material (if needed) in the future wouldn't be a big deal.
 
  • #15
sophiecentaur said:
Why not make loops on the ends of the lines and hook them over when you've joined the bits?
I think that would work well with strng. But with (thin, slippery, spring) nylon fishing line it might be tricky.

sophiecentaur said:
Alternatively, you can get hold of very wide mesh net which won't hurt or catch the birds but they won't stay there for long.

Also, you can get plastic spikes which they won't want to land on.
Yes! That's what I would do! But my neighbour specifically wants something effectively 'invisible' - and has already given me a reel of fishing line for this purspoe!
 
  • #16
Steve4Physics said:
my neighbour has already bought a reel of nylon line
Presumably you'll be using a criss cross network all over the roof. The secret is to do the knots at the posts/ nails. You can make a loop on one fixing, pull the line taught and wrap it several times around the far end fixing. You can then use half hitches round the tight line or any other knot using slack line. There is no need to join line at a mid point. The line will age and go brittle due to sunlight so your system should allow for easy repairs and that makes it even more important to avoid fiddly joins half way across the roof.
 
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  • #17
I think the (a) knot you want is the Trucker's Hitch. But I agree, nylon is stretchy and will likely loosen up.
 
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  • #18
DaveE said:
nylon is stretchy and will likely loosen up.
My ex father in law used to tie bowlines for pretty much all of his fishing. I can't remember knots ever loosening up., especially with very modest forces from a panicking bird. Thing about a bowline is that it's easy to remember.
Many turns around a nail or post will provide plenty of friction and are easy to achieve under most circumstances.
BTW, there are quick release attachments for nylon line. One of these on one free end and a simple loop (with bowline) on the other, eliminate the need for tying under tension. (Fishing snap swivel)
1685267997078.png
 
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  • #19
sophiecentaur said:
Presumably you'll be using a criss cross network all over the roof. The secret is to do the knots at the posts/ nails. You can make a loop on one fixing, pull the line taught and wrap it several times around the far end fixing. You can then use half hitches round the tight line or any other knot using slack line. There is no need to join line at a mid point. The line will age and go brittle due to sunlight so your system should allow for easy repairs and that makes it even more important to avoid fiddly joins half way across the roof.
Thanks for the reply. For info', the lines are only required along one edge of the roof. My neighbour has an antique wooden garden bench under that edge and is trying to prevent bird droppings falling on it.

The point about the line going brittle due to sunlight is well-taken.
 
  • #20
sophiecentaur said:
one possibility could be to clamp the two ends of the line and take tension off the two free ends. Any fishing knot would work and you could tie it at your leisure. If you are vaguely DIY inclined, it would be straightforward to pre-tension the lines onto a rod with a couple of Jubilee clips. Nylon stretches easily if the total length is several metres.
Thanks. Clamping is a good idea. Sandwiching the line between 2 pieces of wood (screwed together so friction is adjustable) might be a good option.
 
  • #22
Many thanks to all for the excellent suggestions. For information, I used @DaveC426913's suggestion in Post #2 and hung a small weight (a rolled up strip of some old roofing lead) on the end of each line.

If the lines break, replacing them with some (rust-resistant) wire will be straightforward.
 
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  • #23
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DaveC426913 said:
A 30" boat you say...
It seems to be the smallest boat on which a bird can land. :smile:
 
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  • #25
DaveC426913 said:
A 30" boat you say...
If the word "boat" appears in an ad, you can add some zeros onto the price of anything. There was no price on the Amazon ad.

The lead weight tensioner could be good but a gull or pigeon could be strong enough to lift a substantial weight - experiment needed perhaps.
 
  • #26
sophiecentaur said:
The lead weight tensioner could be good but a gull or pigeon could be strong enough to lift a substantial weight - experiment needed perhaps.
We have both pigeons and (despite being not being on the coast) gulls. I shall report any interesting changes.
 
  • #27
Those gulls are very beefy animals - they can cope with a tough existence at sea so they could wreck any structure that's not pretty strong. Pigeons not so much.
 
  • #28
DaveC426913 said:
A 30" boat you say...
sophiecentaur said:
... a gull or pigeon could be strong enough to lift a substantial weight...
1685567628047.png
 
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  • #29
Steve4Physics said:
TL;DR Summary: I need to tie a few metres of fishing line so it is taut. I can tie one end while the line is slack. But then tying the other end, while keeping line taut, will be tricky. Any special knots which will do the job?

Hi. I need to tie some nylon monofilament fishing line so that it’s under tension. (Only moderate tension is needed – pulling by hand to make the line taut is sufficient.)

I can tie one end to a support, e.g. using a using a ‘uni-knot’. Then the line will need to be stretched and the other end will need to be wrapped around/tied to another support a few metres away.

Nylon fishing line is springy and smooth; this will make it difficult to tie while simultaneously being held taut.

Does anyone know of any suitable knots (or have any other suggestions)?

(FWIW, this is for a bird deterrent system my neighbour has asked me to put on her garage roof. The birds are fond of perching on the edge of the roof and performing their toilet-functions. She thinks some nylon lines won't be too noticeable and may be sufficient to stop the birds perching there.)
I actually fish everyday cant say I have ever thought about it for that application. You can start off with an overhand to keep the tension and pretty much tie whatever you need after. "if you cant tie a knot tie a lot" really does work in most applications outside of fishing. Your best bet is to use overhands you can sinch the first one as much as you need and then keep going. not the prettiest knot or the strongest but for your application probably the best.
 
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  • #30
practicalphysicsnoob said:
. "if you cant tie a knot tie a lot" really does work in most applications outside of fishing.
...and sailing.

That'll getcha killed... or worse, damage your boat.
 
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