Laplace transform physical meaning

In summary, the Fourier transform is a way to convert a function from the time domain to the frequency domain. The Laplace transform is a generalization of the Fourier transform, where the function is transformed to a function of s, where s is a complex number with a real part representing attenuation and an imaginary part representing frequency. The output of the Laplace transform represents the amplitude and phase of the spectral component of the input function. There is also a relationship between the frequency in the Fourier transform and the speed of a rotating wheel observed from different frames of reference.
  • #1
psmitty
16
0
When comparing time and frequency domains, it is easy to imagine the meaning of the Fourier transform.

In time domain, our function takes time as a parameter, and returns the value (result) of our process.

When we make a Fourier transform of the same function, we take it to the frequency domain, meaning we get a different function which accepts frequency as a parameter, and returns the complex value representing the amplitude and phase of the spectral (sinusoidal) component of our initial function.

Now, Laplace transform should be a generalization of Fourier if I got it right. Function in Laplace domain is a function of s, where s=σ+jw, where σ is attenuation, and w corresponds to the same frequency as in FT. So, for σ=0, it returns the same result as FT.

So, what I don't understand it:

1. What does attenuation exactly mean? This should be an exponential function multiplying the input sinusoidal function of frequency w?

2. What does the result of LT correspond to, "physically"? Is it amplitude+phase again? The problem is, in FT, we passed a one-dimensional variable and got a two-dimensional variable. Here, we have a two-dimensional input, and again get two-dimensional output. In this case, what happens to attenuation information at output? Surely the output of LT should not represent a periodical function if the input function is attenuated. But obviously, it represents a periodical function for σ=0.
 
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  • #2
Ok, so in other words, speed of the wheel (RPM) when observed from the stationary frame, should increase as the bike moves faster, and be proportional to the speed of bike.

Meanwhile, RPM will be even larger in the moving frame, because road will be contracted and less time will pass between full turns.
 

Related to Laplace transform physical meaning

1. What is the physical meaning of the Laplace transform?

The Laplace transform is a mathematical tool used to convert a function of time to a function of complex frequency. This allows us to analyze and understand the behavior of a system in the frequency domain, which can provide insight into the physical characteristics and behaviors of the system.

2. How is the Laplace transform used in physics?

In physics, the Laplace transform is often used to solve differential equations that describe the behavior of physical systems. It can also be used to analyze the frequency response of a system, such as in electrical circuits or mechanical systems.

3. What are the advantages of using the Laplace transform in physics?

The Laplace transform allows for a simpler and more efficient way to solve differential equations, as it converts them into algebraic equations. It also provides a way to analyze the frequency response of a system, which can be useful in understanding and controlling its behavior.

4. Are there any limitations to using the Laplace transform in physics?

One limitation of the Laplace transform is that it assumes the system is linear and time-invariant. This means that the system's behavior does not change over time and is not affected by the input signal's amplitude. Additionally, the Laplace transform may not be applicable to systems with discontinuities or non-smooth functions.

5. How does the Laplace transform relate to the Fourier transform?

The Laplace transform is a generalization of the Fourier transform, which is used to convert a function from the time domain to the frequency domain. The main difference is that the Laplace transform includes a complex exponential term, making it applicable to a wider range of functions and systems.

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