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News Legalize file-sharing on the Internet

  1. Jun 8, 2009 #1
    http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/europe/06/08/pirate.party.eu.win/

    A one-issue party that doesn't care about the environment, the economy or the jobs? The salvation for an increasingly authoritarian EU that compromises heavily when it comes to integrity issues?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 8, 2009 #2
    Re: Pirates!

    That's big irony.There is no doubt that EU is not "Global Factor" anymore.Give clear example of that to you: When USA decided to attack Iraq,EU objected that,but USA do not care them.Anybody does not listen to EU anymore.Eu is just like a Disneyland in terms of education,famous historical cities.
     
  4. Jun 8, 2009 #3

    Borek

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    Re: Pirates!

    Weak argument. When deciding to attack Iraq USA also didn't care about logic and common reason.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2009 #4

    f95toli

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    Re: Pirates!

    It is not quite fair to call them a single issue party; they are more of a single TOPIC party. They are focusing on all Internet/telecom issues and lately the file sharing hasn't been quite as important.
    It is true that they were founded because of the file-sharing issue but their biggest boost came when the Sweden implemented a recent EU directive that requires ISP so log and save IP numbers etc, another recent law made it easier for FRA (roughly to the Swedish equivalent of NSA or GCHQ) to get permission to intercept Internet traffic that passes through Sweden. Both of these issues have been VERY controversial,even among members of the major parties.

    The Pirate Party has been getting a lot of support from various IT companies etc (who don't like the idea of having to "police" the Internet traffic they carry) so they are not quite as much as a "fringe" movement as one might thing; they are not extremists or anarchists.

    Note that I am not saying that I would vote for them; but I can understand why many people did.
     
  6. Jun 8, 2009 #5
    Re: Pirates!

    Thieves!
     
  7. Jun 8, 2009 #6
    Re: Pirates!

    They are certainly extremists, and you're disingenuously offering up a strawman distraction. If governments enact unreasonable, authoritarian measures, that is a problem, and it is a separate issue from the crimes they attempt to redress. The flaws of the cop do not exonerate the criminal. Pirates are thieves, and it's a disgrace that they've managed to blur ethics so muddily that voters think they're some sort of rights activists. :grumpy:

    Shame on Sweden.
     
  8. Jun 8, 2009 #7

    Borek

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    Re: Pirates!

    Few years ago I wanted to buy a complete set of The Blue Planet (Attenborough documentary) on DVD. I wanted a legal copy. It was unavaiable in Poland, so I have checked amazon.com - and it was there, for - say $40. I decided it was a good price, and I was raedy to click when it occured to me that due to region codes my DVD won't be probably able to play the DVD. So I have checked amazon.co.uk and it was for around 40 GBP. Difference in price was absolutely inacceptable, and the only reason for this difference was that some idiot decided that people living in Europe should pay more. I have not bought the set, but my faith on good will of copyright owners was seriously undermined.

    A year or two later i decided I want to listen to some music - and it happened that at the time itunes.com started (or some other similar service). So I logged, registered - and learnt that everybody in Poland is a thief, so I can't buy anything.

    Sorry, but Big Four is the last source of ethics to me, unless I will be looking for a blurred version. They are bunch of greedy bullies, using law to their advantage - see Mickey Mouse Protection Act. Good that someone tries to oppose them.
     
  9. Jun 8, 2009 #8
    Re: Pirates!

    Guess what drove up the prices to start with? :rolleyes:
     
  10. Jun 8, 2009 #9
  11. Jun 8, 2009 #10

    f95toli

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    Re: Pirates!

    Did you actually read my post? As I wrote above: All I am saying is that I seriously doubt they would have gotten anywhere near 7% if they had been all about file sharing. The debate in Sweden over the past few months has been all about FRA and the implementation of IPRED (which is a EU-wide directive); file sharing as such has largely been a non-issue (expect when it comes to the Piratebay trial).

    The problem with the main parties when it comes to questions regarding the Internet is that they too often only listen to one side of the argument (and the Swedish parliament had a seriously bad track-record when it comes to Internet-related legislation long before file sharing was an issue).
    The reason why I am saying that the Pirate parties are not extremists is that they were opposed to changing EXISTING laws.

    The so-called FRA law (which passed recently) I referred to above has absolutely nothing to do with file sharing; FRA is part of the military intelligence and they are not allowed to operate inside the country; i.e. the law is all about giving them more rights when it comes to listening to traffic passing THROUGH the country; it is about spying on communications between other countries. The problem is of course that it is not at all obvious who will make sure that they follow the rules; FRA is as VERY secret organization and there have been serious concerns when it comes to external oversight.

    Now, IPRED is of course related to file-sharing but the debate has -again- been more about the implementation (and once again the main parties seem to be oblivious). The main problems with the law as it stands is that gives e.g. a record company the right to demand that than ISP hand over information about who is using a certain IP number. Now, I don't have a problem with the record companies protecting their property; but I DO think that these things should be handled by the police (with a warrant); stolen property is a crime and should not be handled by the companies themselves.
    Secondly, another problem is that laws passed at the same time require an ISP to log Internet ALL traffic (IP numbers) and keep the records for 6 months; i.e someone could quite easily check which websites I visited 3 weeks ago (but again, I wouldn't have a problem with the police monitoring traffic, as long as they have a warrant and they are targeting a suspect).
    There are other issues as well but I guess there were the main ones. Again, to some extent the Pirate party actually have more "mainstream" views (=the old laws) when it comes to these issues than many of the established parties.

    Now, would I vote for the Pirate Party? No; there are more important issues and I don't like their ideology (which I think is too liberal). However, I DO understand why someone who is disillusioned about the main parties and want to protest against the establied parties would.
    Also, I don't actually have a problem with them being in the EU-parliament (one member); hopefully they will be able to keep the debate alive.


    Also, I think it is a bit curious that this has been getting so much attention; the fact that a racist party like the BNP here in the UK get two send two people to the parliament should be much more worrying (not to mention Wilders party in the Netherlands, they came 2nd!)
     
  12. Jun 8, 2009 #11
    Re: Pirates!

    You are blurring the difference between copyright infringement and theft. Not that I have any interest in defending piracy, but there is a obvious difference between sneaking a CD out of a store and getting a copy of it from a friend. I hope the Pirate Party will help the EU come to better acknowledging that difference, as the industry lobby has been far to successful in their efforts to obscure it.
     
  13. Jun 8, 2009 #12

    LowlyPion

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    Re: Pirates!

    In the one case the store owner gets ripped off - the CD company gets paid. In the other, the CD company gets ripped off through loss of a sale. The retail operation derives no benefit either way. In fact given a choice the store owner would rather you rip it off on-line than from his store.

    Either way there is economic harm inflicted. Neither is a victimless crime.
     
  14. Jun 8, 2009 #13
    Re: Pirates!

    Are you so proud of that move that you fail to realize you should have listened ?
     
  15. Jun 8, 2009 #14
    Re: Pirates!

    That doesn't rightly follow; were the friend incapable of making a copy he might have just loaned out his original instead.

    More to your argument, I'd wager the majority of content pirated is stuff the pirates never would have bought anyway. For example sake; say someone tells me I should listen to some particular song, but instead of purchasing it off iTunes or whatever, I look it up on YouTube to listen to it there. Would you call me a thief for that?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 8, 2009
  16. Jun 8, 2009 #15
    Re: Pirates!

    Ethics regarding copyrights have been blurred in the other direction for decades. Copyright was instituted originally to protect artists and writers for approximately fifteen years in order to promote these endeavours by allowing for better financial benefits to the individuals that undertake them. The overarching purpose was to benefit the public by continued infusion of educational and culturally significant material from a properly motivated class of intellectual entrepreneurs. The material is supposed to eventually fall into the public domain to the benefit of everyone. Before this the idea that something like the image of the Mona Lisa or the sound of Beethovens 9th belonged to anyone other than the people was rediculous.

    Fast forward to the 20th century and we find the corporations of post industrial nations seeking to benefit from the intellectual endeavours of individuals. Through the monopolization of publishing houses and by contract with book sellers the corporate publishers eventually made it nearly impossible for individuals to become successfully published authors without them. This situation begat the 'vanity publisher', an alternative for authors to major corporate publishing, which is yet another industry mostly designed to take advantage of writers.
    Taking a look at the music industry which is the most vocal in current copyright issues we will also find the most notorious exploiter of individual copyright owners. Cases of the music industry ruining and making slaves of musicians are legend.
    Then there is Disney. The first and, until recently, most vocal champion of extending and strengthening copyright protection was primarily out to protect their biggest and most iconic money making machine. "Save Mickey Mouse" became the war cry of a movement that tricked the public into accepting the legal and social revolution which has led to a perversion of copyright law that protects the corporations holding our culture hostage.

    In our modern world the internet makes the sharing of information by both creators and audiences much easier. It is tearing down the conventions created by corporations for the disemination of ideas an information. It is no wonder that the contingent of vocal supporters for further strengthening the long arm of copyright protection are major corporations while individual creators who make their material freely available on the internet enjoy much greater success than they would have otherwise. And no wonder that this Pirate Party are seen as a modern Robin Hood fighting against the opression of wealthy fat cats.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2009
  17. Jun 10, 2009 #16
    Re: Pirates!

    Democracy sucks, huh? :biggrin: You can never know when you have to disagree with large amount of folks.
     
  18. Jun 10, 2009 #17

    LowlyPion

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    Re: Pirates!

    Browsing is not the complaint of the artists. Mix disc compilations of your faves blown from your computer and dropped in car cds or played repetitively through your iPod is.

    The issue with codifying copyright law is determining the point at which there is commercial infringement. You can't mitigate the crime of one extreme with examples at the other.
     
  19. Jun 10, 2009 #18
    Re: Pirates!

    I am not attempting to mitigate anything, and as I previously stated I have no interest in defending piracy. Rather, I am taking issue with your "loss of a sale" argument by providing an example of what one can classify as a lost sale, and one which I believe is technically prosecutable under the DMCA.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 11, 2009
  20. Jun 11, 2009 #19
    Re: Pirates!

    There is no crime to begin with, since intellectual property does not exist. If I analyze one of your cookies, then go bake my own, have I stolen something from you? Of course not.

    Furthermore, the loss of revenue argument does not hold water. Since the prices are so high I would not have bought it to begin with.
     
  21. Jun 13, 2009 #20
    Re: Pirates!

    I wonder, would cloning someone's special breed of poodle be prosecutable?

    Here is an interesting discussion on the copy writing of genes, including yours: http://pointofinquiry.org/"

    This seems applicable to our discussion.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
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