Limits of polynomials at infinity

In summary, the speaker was having trouble understanding how to solve a limit involving factoring and infinity. They asked for help and eventually figured out their mistake with the help of examples from a math tutorial website. The conversation ended with the speaker expressing relief and confusion over their initial misunderstanding.
  • #1
DeepSeeded
113
1
Help, I am infinitly confused :)

When solving the limit for this type and factoring the largest power of a variable in the polynomial in order to make its coefficient become a limit multiplied by another limit of Infinity I get lost. I just do not understand how (Infinity)(5 + Infinity + Infinity -Infinity) = (Infinity)(5). Where did all the other infinities go??

I hope that makes sense. There is much better examples on the first few problems on this page http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/CalcI/LimitsAtInfinityI.aspx
 
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  • #2
Ahh, I found what I was doing wrong. lim(1/x) as x->Inf = 0 not Inf

I am new to this can you tell :P

0 + 0 + 0 + 0 is so much more understandable.
 
  • #3
what exactly are you asking for?
 
  • #4
I think he solved his problem himself.:smile:
 

Related to Limits of polynomials at infinity

What are polynomials?

Polynomials are mathematical expressions that consist of variables and coefficients, combined using addition, subtraction, and multiplication. They can also include exponents, but not fractions or square roots.

What is the degree of a polynomial?

The degree of a polynomial is the highest exponent in the expression. For example, in the polynomial 3x^2 + 5x + 1, the degree is 2.

What does it mean for a polynomial to approach infinity?

When a polynomial approaches infinity, it means that as the value of the variable in the polynomial gets larger and larger, the value of the polynomial also gets larger and larger without bound. In other words, the polynomial does not have a finite limit at infinity.

Can a polynomial have a limit at infinity?

No, a polynomial cannot have a limit at infinity. This is because the value of a polynomial increases or decreases without bound as the value of the variable gets larger and larger.

How do you find the limit of a polynomial at infinity?

To find the limit of a polynomial at infinity, you can use the leading term of the polynomial. The limit will be either positive infinity, negative infinity, or does not exist, depending on the sign of the leading term and the degree of the polynomial.

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