Linear Algebra or Calculus III

  • Thread starter mvantuyl
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  • #26
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I am terribly confused as to why you are call referring to "Calc II" and "Calc III" as if you all went to the same university :-/

Me too, but that's probably due to all the US students here, who for some reason seem to have a lot of identical courses all over the country.

It confused me at the beginning too. I actually go to a US school, but my school is on quarter system. At my school, it's more like I - Differential Calculus, II - Integral Calculus, and
III - Sequence and Series (with a few additional topics), and multivariable calculus was a two-quarter sequence, calling them multivariable calculus I and II. But I guess most of the schools use semester system, so I had to figure these out on my own.

I know, and that's what's sad. We spent almost all semester "parameterizing" curves again and again and again and then spent the last week on the important culminating theorems. I don't know them at all, neither does anyone else in that class, which is why I can't even read Maxwell's Equations in their differential forms with grads and curls and stuff.

The experience with me in multivariable calculus was kind of similar--although we certainly did spent more than a week to cover those materials! I felt like multivariable calculus was just a bunch of long and tedious computations until we got to the vector analysis chapter at the end, even though I felt like we should have spent more time on those stuff. The textbook I used for that course (Stewart) wasn't necessary great at that chapter--I felt like he just squeezed every detail of vector analysis into just one chapter so that he can save some pages. Fortunately, I had a pretty good instructor who went into more details than what the book covered.
 
  • #27
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From Rubrix:
The key idea is "Pre-requisite"; Calculus III depends on good knowledge of integration and differentiation. The Calc III material also includes continued use of techniques of integration.



Ignoring the prerequisite of Calculus II for Calculus III is a bad academic risk.

you sir are being vague again. I asked you for *specific* integration techniques that you learn in calc II...and are tested in calc III. And all you came up with "The key idea is 'Pre-requisite'"...erm i'm sure everyone here know that. Beside, there are cases where a course and it's pre-requisite might not have any relevance at all. Of course in this case there is a relevance but imagine this...

in our university pre-requisite for "Intro to Advanced Mathematics*" is Clac III. For the said course you don't need any knowledge of calculus...even the professor admitted it.

* this course includes basic of set theory, proofs, group, module etc.
 
  • #28
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You got any course on tensors then? Because it sounds a lot like that is what you want.

Anyway, where I go we do gauss, stokes, greens and such in the first multivariable but just a little the last weeks. Then in vector we used them all the time.

Actually, I don't know when tensors shows up, although I'd be surprised if its not in there somewhere. We talked about them in linear algebra, although it was mainly off topic musings.

In my school, multivariable is the course the engineers/physicists take while vector calculus is the course mathematicians take. Although quite a few fellow physics majors took vector calc with me (I'm also a math major) and I have to say, the physics guys understood the last stuff better (like why orientation matters in field lines, how its parallel to Gauss's law for magnetism and how every field line always circles back in and thus each "outwards" field line cancels its respective "inwards" field line = 0).
Also, the physics guys were a lot more fun, less creepy and socially awkward. Just sayin.

The experience with me in multivariable calculus was kind of similar--although we certainly did spent more than a week to cover those materials! I felt like multivariable calculus was just a bunch of long and tedious computations until we got to the vector analysis chapter at the end, even though I felt like we should have spent more time on those stuff. The textbook I used for that course (Stewart) wasn't necessary great at that chapter--I felt like he just squeezed every detail of vector analysis into just one chapter so that he can save some pages. Fortunately, I had a pretty good instructor who went into more details than what the book covered.
I have a feeling my prof. ran out of space at the end. Regardless, I've decided I'm going to take ODE and Real Analysis and THEN judge the math department, see if I'm willing to take on a math major here. Hopefully, I just came across two not so greatly taught intro courses last year.
 
  • #29
269
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you sir are being vague again. I asked you for *specific* integration techniques that you learn in calc II...and are tested in calc III. And all you came up with "The key idea is 'Pre-requisite'"...erm i'm sure everyone here know that. Beside, there are cases where a course and it's pre-requisite might not have any relevance at all. Of course in this case there is a relevance but imagine this...

in our university pre-requisite for "Intro to Advanced Mathematics*" is Clac III. For the said course you don't need any knowledge of calculus...even the professor admitted it.

* this course includes basic of set theory, proofs, group, module etc.

I'm a bit confused. You cover set theory, proofs, group theory, modules, AND vector calculus? In one class?
 
  • #30
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I'm a bit confused. You cover set theory, proofs, group theory, modules, AND vector calculus? In one class?
No, the point is that he didn't cover vector at all in that class which is why the prerequisite was 100% bogus.
 
  • #31
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At my university, there's two semesters per year.

Calculus I is 100 level
Calculus II is 200 Level, and there is also Differential Equations I at this level
Differential Equations II is at 300 level

hence my confusion.
 
  • #32
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Thank you all for the input. I have signed up for Linear Algebra in the fall and plan to take Calculus III in the spring.
 
  • #33
fluidistic
Gold Member
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152
Thank you all for the input. I have signed up for Linear Algebra in the fall and plan to take Calculus III in the spring.

Congrats! That was the best thing to do IMO. Good luck now!
 
  • #34
136
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good. study well now, the course is VERY important..although it might seem boring (it seemed boring to me).
 

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