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Looking for a math study/project-mate

  1. May 1, 2013 #1
    Sorry if this is the wrong place to post in, but since this post has much to do with mathematics, and a positive reply relies on maximum viewership, I reasoned it would be best to post here on General Math.

    I'm a math major and was wondering what to do over this summer, since I'm not going for any internships/have any fixated family agenda. I was thinking of working out a book, like Spivak, or work on a math-related project. In fact, some time back here on PF, I had posted a thread "Project-Mathematics of Crime-fighting" where Stephen Tashi, Vargo and others had given me very interesting ideas to work on. Sadly, that didn't turn out as expected. The reason was myself; I got demotivated rather quickly :redface: (feeling rather ashamed about it). Initially, I was enthusiastic, but when it came to researching the concepts, and working out the math, I guess the lack of someone to spark off the ideas with, and share my thoughts, eventually put me off.

    So, in order to not repeat the same mistake again, and to do something fun this summer, I'm looking for a study/project-mate; so that can bounce off our ideas and intuition, and learn something new in the process. I'm open to doing anything, as long it's interesting and challenging math that we'd both be comfortable with. Collaboration would be purely online, through email/other means which can be discussed. The stipulated time period would be May 20th - July 20th, but I guess that can be discussed as well.

    The only factor I'm looking for, is an interest towards mathematics/analyzing stuff mathematically. Provided that, I don't think it'll be that hard to find something to work on, that's interesting for both of us.

    A grander idea would have been to build a small online team of 5-6 members, but I guess that's asking for much. So, anyone up for it? :smile:
     
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  3. May 1, 2013 #2

    Fredrik

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    Since there's no exchange of money involved, we do not consider this a violation of the rule about soliciting, and will allow it.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
  4. May 1, 2013 #3

    Office_Shredder

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    I would be interested in working on some sort of math project. Do you have any specific ideas?
     
  5. May 1, 2013 #4

    WannabeNewton

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    We could go through Bartle's measure theory text if you're up for it. I've been meaning to complete the elegant little text. ;)
     
  6. May 1, 2013 #5
    I'll give you $20 to make it a violation.
     
  7. May 2, 2013 #6

    Stephen Tashi

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    That sounds like a realistic estimate for someone who will have other things to do after the summer. I don't think you will be able to go through a typical math book in 2 months, even a small book. A few chapters of a book would be a reasonable goal or perhaps study a published paper. Or tackle a real world problem like http://proteneer.com/blog/?p=1557
     
  8. May 2, 2013 #7

    Stephen Tashi

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    Another idea: Study the material on someone's math blog. Then you can exchange comments with the blogger. You and any partners will have those communcations as added motivation.

    A math blog that I find interesting is http://drexel28.wordpress.com/. I'm not sure it's active now. (Perhaps its author also needs some motivation!) He did appreciate people reading his pages and pointing out minor typos. I think he presents mathematical ideas well. (And if you're going into a math as a career, you should get to know the mathematicians of the future.)
     
  9. May 3, 2013 #8
    Hey Office_Shredder! Glad to know you're interested! :smile: I've been thinking about doing something on Richardson extrapolation, which was suggested to me a while back, by Stephen Tashi. And now, I find the problem mentioned in his link above, interesting as well! (though I didn't completely understand it). Let me know if you have any specific ideas/projects/topics in mind. I haven't finalized on anything yet, as I've found a couple other people passionate in math as well interested in joining our group, and would like to hear out their ideas and interests as well.

    So, do you confirm upon working with us as a group, Office_Shredder? :smile:
     
  10. May 3, 2013 #9
    Ah, I'm sorry, but I feel Measure Theory might be a bit too much for me. I'm just a beginner when it comes to Real Analysis (having just started Spivak) and I believe that's a major prerequisite to Measure theory. Sorry, but I think I'm not ready to appreciate it's elegance, yet.
     
  11. May 3, 2013 #10
    Good hearing from you after so long, Stephen! I feel guilty doing nothing whatsoever, especially after you had provided so many valuable comments in that previous thread. :redface: I swear I'll work hard this time though! :smile:

    Hmm, I haven't decided what to do yet, as the group hasn't been finalized yet. The link you mentioned above seems very interesting though. Do you have links to more of these kind of interesting open problems?

    I think that's a brilliant idea! And I found the above blog quite fun; even though most of the stuff was quite over my head, I found his method of exposition very entertaining! Do you have any more blogs to suggest, perhaps with a tad lighter math? I've tried looking for math blogs in the past, but all of them were either book resources/inactive for years. Thanks again, Stephen!
     
  12. May 3, 2013 #11

    CAF123

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    I think I am at about the same stage as you in learning math, so I am quite interested also. What sort of things were you thinking of doing (or what did you start off doing last summer?)
     
  13. May 3, 2013 #12

    WannabeNewton

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    No need to apologize mate! Spivak is harder anyways :rofl: Best of luck!
     
  14. May 4, 2013 #13

    Office_Shredder

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    Richardson extrapolation looks pretty interesting as a technique but I don't see what exactly you would do to make a project out of it.

    Looking at an open combinatorics type problem (or other easily accessible problem) would be fun
     
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