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Making a metal based anti-freeze

  1. Jun 3, 2009 #1
    I'm trying to formulate an completely liquid metal-based anti-freeze.
    I was thinking on using Mn, but I'm not sure whether it will stay in an aqueous state
    After I adding KMnO2 to water to get the Mn in aqueous state.
    Any help?
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  3. Jun 4, 2009 #2

    alxm

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    You mean metal-ion, not liquid metal. Mercury is a liquid metal.

    Anyway, I'd suggest you go look up the solubility data in the CRC handbook or wherever.

    But why do you want to do this? And why KMnO2 specifically?
     
  4. Jun 4, 2009 #3
    I think you mean supspension of small particles of metal in a liquid medium. Metals have a nasty habbit of sticking to other metals and clogging things up, like the surface of radiators and engine blocks. Certain metalic suspensions are use to plug radiator leaks. Why do you want a metalic supsension?
     
  5. Jun 4, 2009 #4

    alxm

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    Why would you think that? KMnO2 is a metal-ion compound, not a metal. (and 'aqueous' usually denotes the dissociated form if it's an ionic compound) A suspension of metal particles would have relatively little effect on the freezing point.
     
  6. Jun 4, 2009 #5
    My mistake. It was getting late
     
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