Masters in EE/applied physics with CHE undergrad

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I am currently a rising junior studying chemical engineering and minoring in computer science at a pretty strong state school. I struggled choosing my major within the engineering school as I was interested in nanotech, materials, chemistry, physics and computers. I ultimately picked CHE because I felt it encompassed the majority of my interests.

I have been doing a lot of research into what I want to study after undergraduate school and have essentially narrowed my interests down to continuing with CHE or studying either applied physics, EE, or materials science. I guess I'm interested in knowing if EE/applied physics are realistic possibilities for grad school given my undergraduate concentrations?

I still have time to pursue a minor in EE at this point (instead of CS) if it would improve my chances of acceptance to an EE masters program. The most drastic possibility would be to switch to EE now but that may be more hassle than it's worth if I can get into a graduate program without switching. Any feedback would be great!
 
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Thanks for the post! This is an automated courtesy bump. Sorry you aren't generating responses at the moment. Do you have any further information, come to any new conclusions or is it possible to reword the post?
 
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I can't say much since I am an undergraduate as well haha, but one thing to consider is that most applied physics programs require you or at least heavily recommend that you take the physics GRE when applying to their programs. Also, I am doing my undergraduate in engineering science, which could also be something to look into for graduate school. Engineering science/ engineering physics programs may also cover many of your interests depending on the university. Ultimately, as I understand it (which could be wrong) your choice of program will mainly depend on what it is exactly you want to study and or do research with in graduate school, and seeing what department and program it falls under. Some universities cover the same topics in different departments. What are your interests in EE/Applied physics?
 
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Hey thanks for the reply. I have looked at many graduate applied physics programs and very few actually require the physics gre. However I'm sure, as you mentioned, it is recommended or beneficial to take it. Engineering science interests me too and could be an option for schools which don't offer applied physics. As far as my interests, I have helped out in a lab on campus in the ECE department which does nanomaterial research-specifically related to graphene. That certainly intrigues me but I am also very excited by anything space related, electrochemistry or solar technology. As I mentioned I don't really have just one area of interest.
 
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Hey thanks for the reply. I have looked at many graduate applied physics programs and very few actually require the physics gre. However I'm sure, as you mentioned, it is recommended or beneficial to take it. Engineering science interests me too and could be an option for schools which don't offer applied physics. As far as my interests, I have helped out in a lab on campus in the ECE department which does nanomaterial research-specifically related to graphene. That certainly intrigues me but I am also very excited by anything space related, electrochemistry or solar technology. As I mentioned I don't really have just one area of interest.
My apologies haha, seems I said that part about the physics GRE backwards..
 

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