Master's of Math without a BS in Math?

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  • #1
Poker-face
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Hi all. My question is- is it possible to do well in a Masters in Math Program even though I have not completed a BS in Math. Rutgers Camden has a Masters Program that I can get into as long as I have completed up to Calculus 3, and Linear Algebra. I am only in Calculus 2 now, but I was thinking about taking Calc 3 in the first Term This summer and Linear Algebra in the second term. So far Calc 1 and 2 have seemed pretty easy and I should have no problen getting an A in both courses. I am 32 years old so maturity is on my side. I am very disciplined and will work as hard as necessary to suceed. I am not naive and understand that will alone is not enough. My question is does anyone have an opinon if this is either a good idea or not. My other option would be to stay at the school I am at and complete my second bachelors of which would take me just as long as the Masters.

Thanks for any advice,

Ernie G
 

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  • #2
micromass
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What courses have you already taken?? And, what courses are you planning to take in your masters, or what courses do they provide??

I ask this because I've never heard of someone doing their masters with only knowledge about calculus and linear algebra... But maybe the masters your planning to take, has enough low-level courses...
 
  • #3
Poker-face
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What courses have you already taken?? And, what courses are you planning to take in your masters, or what courses do they provide??

I ask this because I've never heard of someone doing their masters with only knowledge about calculus and linear algebra... But maybe the masters your planning to take, has enough low-level courses...

By the time I enter I will have taken Calc 1,2,3 and Linear Algebra. Here is a copy of the program requirements.......

The minimum requirement to complete the track is to take the 6 required courses and 4 elective courses.

Pure Mathematics Course List:

Required Courses:

56:645:503 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I (3)
56:645:505 Analysis I (3)
56:645:508 Mathematical Reasoning (3)
56:645:531 Geometry (3)
56:645:549-550 Linear Algebra and Applications I,II (3,3)


Elective Courses:

56:645:504 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II (3)
56:645:506 Analysis II (3)
56:645:530 Manifolds (3)
56:645:532 Differential Geometry (3)
56:645:540 Computational Number Theory and Cryptography (3)
56:645:545 Topology (3)
56:645:551-552 Abstract Algebra I,II (3,3)
56:645:570 Special Topics in Pure Mathematics (3)
56:645:575 Qualitative Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations (3)
56:645:698 Independent Study in Pure Mathematics (3)
56:645:700 Thesis in Pure Mathematics (3)
 
  • #4
Kevin_Axion
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The Elective courses look like modules you'd take in a regular undergraduate degree.
 
  • #5
micromass
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I think this courses are doable for somebody with a knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. They look more like undergraduate courses than masters courses. But the courses may also be a bit more difficult than the corresponding undergraduate course.
Anyway, I don't think it will be hard for you to begin this master. So I'd say to go ahead.

I am a bit worried about the reputation of the school. I don't think it's normal to offer such a low-level courses in a masters degree...
 
  • #6
Poker-face
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I think this courses are doable for somebody with a knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. They look more like undergraduate courses than masters courses. But the courses may also be a bit more difficult than the corresponding undergraduate course.
Anyway, I don't think it will be hard for you to begin this master. So I'd say to go ahead.

I am a bit worried about the reputation of the school. I don't think it's normal to offer such a low-level courses in a masters degree...

Micromass,

Thanks for the advice. I agree it seems a little watered down, but I would have to think that it should hold some weight because Rutgers is Nationally Recognized school. I think I am going to go for it.

Ernie G
 

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