Measuring and container math problem

In summary, if the height of the candies in the container increases at the rate of .250 cm/s, the mass of the candies in the container increases at the rate of .0068 kg/s.
  • #1
pcfighter
3
0
i hv a question...?
plis help me!
a vertical container with base area measuring 14 cm by 17 cm is being filled with identical pieces of candy, each with a volume of 50 mm^3 and mass of 0.02 gr. assume that the volume of the empty spaces between the candis is negligible. if the height of the candies in the container increases at the rate of 0.250 cm/s, at what rate (kilograms per minute) does the mass of the candies in the container increases?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2


pcfighter said:
i hv a question...?
plis help me!
a vertical container with base area measuring 14 cm by 17 cm is being filled with identical pieces of candy, each with a volume of 50 mm^3 and mass of 0.02 gr. assume that the volume of the empty spaces between the candis is negligible. if the height of the candies in the container increases at the rate of 0.250 cm/s, at what rate (kilograms per minute) does the mass of the candies in the container increases?

The idea of Homework Help is to help, not do.

What have you done?
What formulas do you think apply?
How have you tried to solve it other than post it here hoping perhaps someone would do it for you?
 
  • #3


yes i get already... :smile: dm/dt=dm/dh x dh/dt

thx.. of ur help
 
  • #4


pcfighter said:
yes i get already... :smile: dm/dt=dm/dh x dh/dt

thx.. of ur help

How much mass can be filled into the increase in volume that the OP says will happen in one second?

You are given mass per volume. You are told the rate of change in height. Any ideas about how to figure the rate of change in volume?
 
  • #5


LowlyPion said:
How much mass can be filled into the increase in volume that the OP says will happen in one second?

You are given mass per volume. You are told the rate of change in height. Any ideas about how to figure the rate of change in volume?

I have the volume at 59.5t, so the rate of change in volume would be 59.5 cm/s. But I don't know what relation to use to relate this volume to mass? Any help would be much appreciated :)
 
  • #6


Never-mind haha I related the rate of volume to the given candy density and found the rate of candy mass change! Thanks anyway :D
 
  • #7


ionic_scream said:
Never-mind haha I related the rate of volume to the given candy density and found the rate of candy mass change! Thanks anyway :D

From your original post:
"each with a volume of 50 mm^3 and mass of 0.02 gr"

I trust this was the density that you used times the increase in volume to establish your mass rate of change.

I'm glad you apparently have a handle on it.
 

Related to Measuring and container math problem

1. How do you accurately measure liquids in a container?

To accurately measure liquids in a container, you will need to use a graduated cylinder or measuring cup. Make sure to read the measurement at eye level and take note of the meniscus, the curved surface of the liquid. Always measure from the bottom of the meniscus for an accurate measurement.

2. What is the difference between volume and capacity?

Volume refers to the amount of space occupied by a substance, while capacity refers to the maximum amount a container can hold. For example, a container with a volume of 500ml can have a capacity of 750ml, meaning it can hold up to 750ml of liquid, but that does not mean it is currently holding that amount.

3. How do you convert between units of measurement for containers?

To convert between units of measurement for containers, you will need to use conversion factors. For example, to convert from liters to milliliters, you would multiply the number of liters by 1000. Make sure to pay attention to the units and use conversion factors that are appropriate for the type of measurement.

4. How do you solve a container math problem?

To solve a container math problem, you will need to first understand the given information, including the measurements of the container and the desired measurement. Then, use appropriate conversion factors to convert between units if necessary. Finally, use basic math operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division to solve for the unknown value.

5. What are some common mistakes to avoid when measuring and solving container math problems?

Some common mistakes to avoid when measuring and solving container math problems include not paying attention to the units of measurement, not using the correct conversion factors, and not considering the meniscus when measuring liquids. It is also important to double check your math and units to ensure accuracy in your calculations.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
296
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
4K
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
4K
Back
Top