Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

A Mechanism of α decay - truth about structure of nuclei

  1. Nov 10, 2017 #1
    α decay probably implies that heavy enough nuclei which undergo this decay, consist relatively loosely bound α particles and extra neutrons.
    I haven't found any theory which views nuclei in this way.
    I value truth in science, and would like to know it, also regarding stucture of nuclei
    and mechanism of α decay.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 10, 2017 #2

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Please post links to the journal articles you've been reading about your question. Thank you.
     
  4. Nov 10, 2017 #3

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

  5. Nov 10, 2017 #4

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    I don't know how you got that impression (see also post 2), but it is wrong.
     
  6. Nov 11, 2017 #5
  7. Nov 12, 2017 at 1:06 AM #6

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    According to Wikipedia, the Gamow theory presented on that page dates from 1928, i.e. two years after Schrödinger published his famous equation. It's commonly seen in introductory modern physics textbooks, but it should be viewed as a historical or heuristic device. Nuclear theory has come a long way since 1928.
     
  8. Nov 12, 2017 at 3:59 AM #7

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    That's indeed true, but there is some truth in Gamov's model since ##\alpha##'s are pretty strongly bound beasts and thus many nuclei show some clustering of ##\alpha##'s, and Gamov's model understanding ##\alpha## decay as tunneling of such "preformed" ##\alpha##'s is a nice qualitative picture of the process. To be quantitative you have to use more realistic models of nuclear structure, of course.
     
  9. Nov 12, 2017 at 7:16 AM #8
    So it looks like we should believe inexistence of nuclear null oscllations. Can the energy of these oscillations be calculated
    using Planck constant h = 6.6267⋅10^-34 J⋅s ?
     
  10. Nov 12, 2017 at 9:10 AM #9

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

  11. Nov 12, 2017 at 10:02 AM #10
    I theorize myself. It seems natural to think that there are some oscillations which after some time lead to α decay.
    And it looks like these oscillatons are incessant. So it invokes the idea of null oscilations.
     
  12. Nov 12, 2017 at 10:46 AM #11

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    It is against our rules to discuss personal theories. Additionally, the question
    is still unanswered.

    If you can quote a paper or textbook which you refer to, please let me know via PM.
    For the moment, this thread will be closed.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Mechanism of α decay - truth about structure of nuclei
Loading...