Mendelian explanation for bicolor coated puppy

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In summary: Mosaic, dominant and recessive, puppy's bicolor coat of black and white, random, X chromosome inactivation, female tissues, tortoiseshell cats.
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Medicol
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1. Mendelian experiments only explain dominant vs recessive gene ratios after generations created by assorted types of mating. But how can I explain the puppy's bicolor coat of black and white given that its parents are one black and one white



2. Supposing that W and B are dominant genes of white and black colors and so 'w' and 'b' are recessive ones. What is the puppy's with a dotted coat ?



3. The Attempt at a Solution . I wish to but truly I don't know
 
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Medicol said:
1. Mendelian experiments only explain dominant vs recessive gene ratios after generations created by assorted types of mating. But how can I explain the puppy's bicolor coat of black and white given that its parents are one black and one white
2. Supposing that W and B are dominant genes of white and black colors and so 'w' and 'b' are recessive ones. What is the puppy's with a dotted coat ?
3. The Attempt at a Solution . I wish to but truly I don't know
The word for it is 'mosaicism'. It happens when different genes of the diploid genome are expressed in different cells and their cellular descendants. It happens most famously with X chromosomes in females. One of the X chromosomes in the XX cells has to be inactivated as otherwise the cell gets an overdose, since one X works in males so that is the right dosage for these genes. The X chromosome inactivation happens by DNA methylation. But it happens some way along the developmental pathway e.g. When there are a dozen or two precursors of the pigment-producing cells, and happens randomly so in some cells one chromosome is inactivated and go on to produce one fur colour, in others the other. Although female's tissues are mosaic for all X-chromosome products, in most cases this would not produce any such obviously noticeable phenotypic effect.

The most well known case is very similar to your example - tortoiseshell cats.

There are other mosaicism mechanisms though.

Follow up with google the various bolded keyphrases.
 
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Related to Mendelian explanation for bicolor coated puppy

What is a Mendelian explanation for bicolor coated puppies?

A Mendelian explanation for bicolor coated puppies refers to the genetic principles proposed by Gregor Mendel to explain the inheritance of traits in offspring. This explanation states that traits are controlled by discrete units of inheritance called genes, which are inherited from both parents and can be dominant or recessive.

How does the Mendelian explanation apply to bicolor coated puppies?

In the case of bicolor coated puppies, the trait for coat color is controlled by two different genes. Each gene has two possible variations, known as alleles. One allele is dominant and produces a specific coat color, while the other is recessive and will only produce that color if both alleles are recessive. Therefore, for a bicolor coated puppy to be born, it must inherit two recessive alleles for coat color from both parents.

What is the probability of producing a bicolor coated puppy using the Mendelian explanation?

The probability of producing a bicolor coated puppy using the Mendelian explanation depends on the genotypes of the parents. If both parents are heterozygous (carrying one dominant and one recessive allele), then there is a 25% chance of producing a bicolor coated puppy. If one parent is heterozygous and the other is homozygous dominant (carrying two dominant alleles), then there is a 50% chance. And if both parents are homozygous dominant, then there is no chance of producing a bicolor coated puppy.

Can two bicolor coated puppies produce a solid coated puppy?

Yes, it is possible for two bicolor coated puppies to produce a solid coated puppy. This can occur if both parents carry the recessive allele for solid coat color, which is then passed on to the offspring. However, the probability of this happening is lower compared to producing bicolor coated puppies, as both parents would need to carry the recessive allele.

Are there any other factors that can affect the coat color of a puppy besides Mendelian genetics?

Yes, there are other factors that can affect the coat color of a puppy, such as environmental factors, epigenetics, and mutations. These factors can cause variations in coat color, even if the Mendelian genetics principles are followed. Additionally, some dog breeds have complex genetics that cannot be fully explained using Mendelian genetics, making it difficult to predict coat colors in offspring.

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